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Market Pulse: North Bay, August 2019

Welcome to NAI Northern California’s “Market Pulse” feature. We checked the pulse of the North Bay commercial real estate market to discover the ups and downs of the office, industrial, retail, and multifamily markets.  Each market has four dimensions: current inventory, 12-month net absorption, under construction, and vacancy rate.

Check out our August 2019 North Bay Market Pulse infographic. If a dimension is on the rise, the pulse goes above the baseline; if it’s on the decline or negative, the pulse will dip below the baseline.

This month the North Bay office market’s inventory is at 40.7 million sq. ft. and holding flat, with 12-month net absorption down at 127,000 sq. ft. of office space. Approximately 17.2 million sq. ft. are under construction with an upward trend. The vacancy rate is at 7.4 percent and expected to drop.

For the industrial market, 105 million sq. ft. of space is in the inventory, with more on the way. The 12-month net absorption is heading up, at 231,000 sq. ft., and the space under construction is also rising, at 1.1 million square feet. The vacancy rate is at 3.4% and holding steady.

There are 65.6 million sq. ft. of retail space available and rising, with a 12-month net absorption rate at 113,000 sq. ft. (a decreasing trend). More is being built, though, with 72,000  sq. ft. under construction. Vacancy rates continue to rise, at 3.7%.

The multifamily market is up to 59,000 units available in the inventory. The 12-month net absorption rate averages just 52 units across the North Bay area and is dropping. Construction is on the upswing here, at 557 units, with a rising vacancy rate of 5.4%.

For more detailed updates or to find out how the North Bay’s submarkets are doing, contact one of our advisors; whether you’re interested in office, industrial, retail, or multifamily properties, we can help.

Market Pulse: South Bay, August 2019

Welcome to NAI Northern California’s “Market Pulse” feature. We checked the pulse of the South Bay commercial real estate market to discover the ups and downs of the office, industrial, retail, and multifamily markets.  Each market has four dimensions: current inventory, 12-month net absorption, under construction, and vacancy rate.

Check out our August 2019 South Bay Market Pulse infographic. If a dimension is on the rise, the pulse goes above the baseline; if it’s on the decline or negative, the pulse will dip below the baseline.

This month the South Bay office market’s inventory is up to 129 million sq. ft., with 12-month net absorption also up at 2.7 million sq. ft. of office space. Approximately 6.2 million sq. ft. are under construction with an upward trend. The vacancy rate is at 8.3 percent and dropping.

For the industrial market, 198 million sq. ft. of space is in the inventory and rising. The 12-month net absorption is on its way up, at 844,000 sq. ft., and the space under construction is also rising, at 771,000 square feet. The vacancy rate is at 5.7% and trending downward.

There are 79.9 million sq. ft. of retail space available and dropping, with a 12-month net absorption rate of 78,000 sq. ft. (a decreasing trend). More is being built, though, with 1 million sq. ft. under construction. Vacancy rates continue to drop, at 3.3%.

The multifamily market is holding strong, up to 144,000 units available in the inventory. The 12-month net absorption rate is 2,500 units and rising. Construction is on the upswing here, at 1,000 units. The vacancy rate is at 4.3% and dropping.

For more detailed updates or to find out how the South Bay’s submarkets are doing, contact one of our advisors; whether you’re interested in office, industrial, retail, or multifamily properties, we can help.

Market Pulse: East Bay, August 2019

Welcome to NAI Northern California’s “Market Pulse” feature. We checked the pulse of the East Bay commercial real estate market to discover the ups and downs of the office, industrial, retail, and multifamily markets.  Each market has four dimensions: current inventory, 12-month net absorption, under construction, and vacancy rate.

Check out our August 2019 East Bay Market Pulse infographic. If a dimension is on the rise, the pulse goes above the baseline; if it’s on the decline or negative, the pulse will dip below the baseline.

This month the East Bay office market’s inventory is up to 112 million sq. ft., with 12-month net absorption down at 819,000 sq. ft. of office space. Approximately 1.4 million sq. ft. are under construction with an upward trend. The vacancy rate is dropping, at 8.2 percent.

For the industrial market, 265 million sq. ft. of space is in the inventory and rising. The 12-month net absorption is almost even, dropping to -1,100 square feet. The space under construction is also dropping, at 6 million square feet, and the vacancy rate is rising to 4.9%.

There are 124 million sq. ft. of retail space available, on an upward trend, with a 12-month net absorption rate of 29,000 sq. ft. (a decreasing trend). Over 340,000 sq. ft. are under construction, with more in the pipeline. Vacancy rates continue to rise, at 3.5%.

The multifamily market is holding strong, up to 170,000 units available in the inventory. The 12-month net absorption rate is 2,000 units. Construction is on the upswing here, at 9,400 units, with a rising vacancy rate of 4.5%.

For more detailed updates or to find out how the East Bay’s submarkets are doing, contact one of our advisors; whether you’re interested in office, industrial, retail, or multifamily properties, we can help.

Market Pulse: San Francisco, August 2019

Welcome to the NAI Northern California’s “Market Pulse” feature. We checked the pulse of the San Francisco commercial real estate market to discover the ups and downs of the office, industrial, retail, and multifamily markets.  Each market has four dimensions: current inventory, 12-month net absorption, under construction, and vacancy rate.

Check out our August 2019 San Francisco Market Pulse infographic. If a dimension is on the rise, the pulse goes above the baseline; if it’s on the decline or negative, the pulse will dip below the baseline.

This month the San Francisco office market’s inventory is up to 176 million sq. ft., with 12-month net absorption at 2.2 million sq. ft. of office space and dropping. Approximately 6.6 million sq. ft. are under construction with an upward trend. The vacancy rate is rising, at 6.2 percent.

For the industrial market, 95 million sq. ft. of space is in the inventory and rising. The 12-month net absorption is at 6,800 sq. ft. and rising. The space under construction is also rising, at 2.5 million square feet. The vacancy rate is at 3.7% and trending upward.

There are 82 million sq. ft. of retail space available, and more coming, with a 12-month net absorption rate of 244,000 sq. ft. heading upward. More is being built, about 433,000 square feet. Vacancy rates have started to drop, at 2.5%.

The multifamily market is holding strong, up to 164,000 units available in the inventory. The 12-month net absorption rate is 2,200 units and rising. Construction is on the upswing here, at 6,200 units, with a decreasing vacancy rate of 3.9%.

For more detailed updates or to find out how San Francisco’s submarkets are doing, contact one of our advisors; whether you’re interested in office, industrial, retail, or multifamily properties, we can help.

How retailers are succeeding in San Francisco

San Francisco’s changing demographics, tricky economics, and transforming neighborhoods are requiring retailers to adapt, but many are rising to the challenge. The city has become one of the most popular destinations for “clicks-to-bricks” retail stores; San Francisco is tied with Los Angeles in second place for where e-commerce retail opens their first physical location (as of 2018). 

One characteristic of successful stores is that they have a story in addition to a popular product; examples include Warby Parker, with 2 SF locations, and Allbirds. Both started as online-only retail (eyeglasses and shoes respectively) and then opened flagship brick-and-morter stores. 

Another winning strategy is anything that will get millennials in the door: experiential retail, pop-ups, fitness centers, and quality food and drink stores like Onedome, CorePower Yoga, and Barry’s Bootcamp are doing well enough to open new locations.

The downtown area is strongest, with stores targeting millennial workers in locations a little off of Market but still within easy reach. The Marina and Pacific Heights are also profitable locations, loci for millennials and far away from centers of homelessness.

 It may soon get much easier to open retail stores in the city; Mayor London Breed has announced a new initiative to speed up the permitting process for small business. The ordinance eases zoning codes, eliminates duplicative inspections, and standardizes local laws to match state regulations. In addition, according to the Mayor’s office, “The proposed investments for Fiscal Years (FY) 2019-20 and 2020-21 include $9 million to provide small businesses with access to capital through low-interest loans, resources for storefront and tenant improvements, and new funding to provide small businesses with financial assistance for regulatory fees.”

Source: Bisnow

NAI Northern California Presents: Record-Breaking Sale of 25 Units in Lafayette

Sale of 3535 Brook Street in the East Bay Area by NAI Northern California sets record price per unit and per sq. ft.

LAFAYETTE, CA –  August 6, 2019 –  NAI Northern California is pleased to announce the sale of 3535 Brook Street in Lafayette for $12 million, which shatters the previous pricing record by more than $50,000 per unit and $44 per square foot. The Mitchell Warren Team and Berger Mandel Team represented both the buyer and seller, delivering an unsolicited all-cash offer. This 25-unit apartment building is blocks from Mt. Diablo Boulevard and from the Lafayette BART station.

“The buyer was looking for assets in the Lafayette market, and our team was able to secure a property that he had wanted to purchase for many years,” according to Vice President Tim Warren. “This was definitely a win/win transaction for both the buyer and seller.”

3535 Brook Street is a fully leased 25-unit apartment complex, a rare multifamily asset in the Lamorinda market. It features an on-site laundry, swimming pool, spacious garden, and generous parking. The site is conveniently located just a block away from Lafayette Square and the downtown shopping district and within walking distance of local schools, library, restaurants, and other amenities.

Lafayette is known for its pastoral rolling hills, good schools, and wealthy inhabitants. In 2016, the median household income in Lafayette was over $140,000, more than twice the statewide average and about two and half times the national median.

It is rated #5 in “Best Places to Live in Contra Costa County” and boasts a thriving nightlife without sacrificing the “small town” feeling and pleasant weather for the variety of outdoor amenities in the vicinity.

Lafayette is also near several local attractions, including but not limited to the Lafayette Hillside Memorial, Lafayette Reservoir Recreation Area, and Briones Regional Park.

The Mitchell Warren Team is comprised of Kent Mitchell, Tim Warren, Randell Silva, and Alex Lin. The Ethan Berger Team is comprised of Ethan Berger, Benjamin Mandel, and Garrett Blair.

 

About NAI Northern California

NAI Northern California is a full service commercial real estate firm serving the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond. Our team delivers technology-enabled commercial real estate services that create value for our clients, industry, and communities.

NAI Northern California is a partner of NAI Global, the largest commercial real estate brokerage network, with more than 375 offices worldwide and over 6,000 professionals completing in excess of $20 billion in commercial real estate transactions globally.

Recently on the San Francisco Business Times Book of Lists, NAI Northern California hit the top 5 and 6 spots in San Francisco and the East Bay and top 15 Bay Area wide. NAI Northern California is part of the NAI Global network, recently recognized by Lipsey as the number 4 most recognizable commercial real estate brand.

Investor confidence in multifamily real estate begins recovery

According to a survey by National Real Estate Investor, confidence in multifamily properties appears to be recovering after a dip in 2018, though all other classes of commercial real estate have been neutral or dropped slightly. The survey asked respondents to rate the attractiveness of the major commercial real estate markets on a scale of one to ten. Most investors prefer multifamily and industrial properties over hotels, office, and retail; last year multifamily and industrial were tied for desirability, but this year multifamily pulled ahead at a 7.9 and industrial fell to a 7.5. They are both still well ahead of the other categories, though; hotels are a 5.9, offices are a 5.8, and retail is just a 4.8. 

Compared to 2018’s rankings, hotels dropped .2 points, offices dropped .1 point, retail held steady, and industrial dropped .2 points. Overall, multifamily has been a rock in the current real estate cycle, despite cap rates being driven lower by the high demand for multifamily. 

While desirability doesn’t necessarily reflect actual sales and purchases, sentiment can be a useful data point in the commercial real estate market. For more information about the current state of the market and how the San Francisco Bay Area differs from the nation as a whole, contact one of our advisors; we have specialists in multifamily and industrial properties as well as office and retail.

Source: National Real Estate Investor

Market Pulse: North Bay, July 2019

Welcome to NAI Northern California’s “Market Pulse” feature. We checked the pulse of the South commercial real estate market to discover the ups and downs of the office, industrial, retail, and multifamily markets.  Each market has four dimensions: current inventory, 12-month net absorption, under construction, and vacancy rate.

Check out our July 2019 North Bay Market Pulse infographic. If a dimension is on the rise, the pulse goes above the baseline; if it’s on the decline or negative, the pulse will dip below the baseline.

This month the North Bay office market’s inventory is at 40.7 million sq. ft. and rising, with 12-month net absorption also up at 325,000 sq. ft. of office space. Approximately 17.2 million sq. ft. are under construction with a downward trend. The vacancy rate is at 6.8 percent and dropping.

For the industrial market, 105 million sq. ft. of space is in the inventory, with more on the way. The 12-month net absorption is heading up, at 164,000 sq. ft., and the space under construction is also rising, at 1 million square feet. The vacancy rate is at 4% and trending upward.

There are 65.7 million sq. ft. of retail space available and rising, with a 12-month net absorption rate nearly neutral at -4,600 sq. ft. (a decreasing trend). Less is being built, though, with 61,000  sq. ft. under construction. Vacancy rates continue to rise, at 3.7%.

The multifamily market is up to 59,000 units available in the inventory. The 12-month net absorption rate averages just 24.2 units across the North Bay area, but is rising. Construction is on the upswing here, at 987 units, with a rising vacancy rate of 3.8%.

For more detailed updates or to find out how the North Bay’s submarkets are doing, contact one of our advisors; whether you’re interested in office, industrial, retail, or multifamily properties, we can help.

Market Pulse: South Bay, July 2019

Welcome to NAI Northern California’s “Market Pulse” feature. We checked the pulse of the South commercial real estate market to discover the ups and downs of the office, industrial, retail, and multifamily markets.  Each market has four dimensions: current inventory, 12-month net absorption, under construction, and vacancy rate.

Check out our July 2019 South Bay Market Pulse infographic. If a dimension is on the rise, the pulse goes above the baseline; if it’s on the decline or negative, the pulse will dip below the baseline.

This month the South Bay office market’s inventory is up to 129 million sq. ft., with 12-month net absorption also up at 1.6 million sq. ft. of office space. Approximately 6.4 million sq. ft. are under construction with an upward trend. The vacancy rate is at 8.6 percent and dropping.

For the industrial market, 198 million sq. ft. of space is in the inventory and rising. The 12-month net absorption is on its way up, at 1.1 million sq. ft., and the space under construction is dropping, at 710,000 square feet. The vacancy rate is at 5.6% and trending downward.

There are 80.1 million sq. ft. of retail space available, with a 12-month net absorption rate of 169,000 sq. ft. (a decreasing trend). Less is being built, though, with 1 million sq. ft. under construction. Vacancy rates continue to drop, at 3.4%.

The multifamily market is holding strong, up to 144,000 units available in the inventory. The 12-month net absorption rate is 2,100 units and rising. Construction is on the downswing here, at 10,00 units, with a rising vacancy rate of 4.7%.

For more detailed updates or to find out how the South Bay’s submarkets are doing, contact one of our advisors; whether you’re interested in office, industrial, retail, or multifamily properties, we can help.

Bay Area markets rank in top 5 for most expensive office space in the Americas

Downtown San Francisco and the Peninsula rank #3 and #4 for the most expensive commercial office space on the continent, according to Globe Street and CBRE. For Q1 2019, the cost per square foot per year for prime office space downtown was $130.51, with office space in the Peninsula costing an average of $116.28 per year. New York City still holds the top two slots, with the Midtown-Manhattan and Midtown-South Manhattan markets, and Boston’s Downtown is just behind the Peninsula at $106.60 per sq. ft. per year.

Office space costs in the Americas continue to rise, 3.7% higher than Q1 of last year, and they’re rising faster; Q1 2018 was only 3.2% more expensive than the previous year. Globally, rents for prime office space rose 3.6% compared to 2.5% the year before.

The most expensive office markets worldwide are Hong Kong Central, at $322; London’s West End at $222.70; and Hong Kong Kowloon at $208.67 per sq. ft. per year. Downtown San Francisco and the Peninsula rank 11th and 13th, behind Beijing’s Finance Street, Beijing’s Central Business District, Tokyo, and the City of London.