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Exclusive: Developer proposes 25-story hotel in Transbay

A San Diego-based hospitality company wants to build an unusual 25-story hotel in San Francisco’s Transbay District.

J Street Hospitality submitted a preliminary proposal for a 185-room hotel at 36 Tehama St., a skinny parcel of land near Howard and First Streets. Because the site is so small — just 4,000 square feet, according to the San Francisco Planning Department — the potential hotel would rise to 25 stories tall, designed with no guest rooms on the first four floors.

Transbay Terminal and the bustling nearby office towers were the biggest draws to the site, said Jeff Schwartz, executive vice president at J Street. Plus, Tehama is a quieter alley than other surrounding streets.

“Just the amount of business and activity that’s going on, within not even half a square mile, is remarkable,” Schwartz said.

The vacant lot is sandwiched between coding bootcamp Galvanize on one side and a parking garage on the other. The project would require a change of use from parking to hotel, and would be topped off with a rooftop bar.

Read more at San Francisco Business Times

 

New hotel proposal beefs up Mid-Market’s development pipeline

The new proposal will join a party of other sites looking to take advantage of the area’s powerful corporate presence.

Another hotel team has thrown their hat into Mid-Market’s development ring with a plan to cater to the neighborhood’s rising corporate and extended-stay demand.

San Francisco-based Stanton Architecture has submitted a preliminary project assessment application for a $40 million, 16-story limited-service hotel slated to deliver 162 rooms to the corner of Mission and Ninth Streets. The proposal would include the demolition of two existing buildings: a vacant commercial property at 1310 Mission St. and a mixed residential-tourist hotel at 80 Ninth St.

With Twitter, Uber, Dolby Laboratories, and Square headquarters just a block or two away, principal Michael Stanton said the project’s location and oversized rooms are a perfect fit.

“With several corporations headquartered there, it’s seen as a business hotel in the week and a family and visitor hotel on the weekend,” he said. “It will be a terrific plus for the area.”

 

Read more at San Francisco Business Times

 

 

Neighbors rise against plan to replace Red Cottage Inn with bigger hotel

Owner wants to tear down small hotel for Hampton Inn with three times as many rooms in Menlo Park, but residents call it too massive.

The owner of a Menlo Park hotel who wants to replace it with three times as many guest rooms is facing fierce opposition from a neighborhood group that threatens to appeal the project if the city approves it.

Sagar Patel, who owns the 28-room Red Cottage Inn at 1704 El Camino Real near the Atherton border, said his proposal to raze the hotel and build a taller, 68-room Hampton Inn in its place checks off all the city’s approval boxes. He’s also made a number of concessions sought by nearby residents, such as better screening for privacy, after meeting with them over the past 16 months, he said.

“I was under impression that we meet (Downtown) Specific Plan requirements and that’s the holy grail,” Patel said. “Not only did we meet them, we exceeded them.”

Residents say they aren’t pleased because after Patel came forward with a proposal in the spring that would have placed all parking underground and set back the building 36 feet from their homes, he later scrapped it saying the concessions would be too costly and without warning, presented a different plan to the Planning Commission during an October study session.

In the latest proposal, parking would be at ground level and setbacks reduced to 10 feet.

“He decided he couldn’t afford underground parking and he changed everything,” said Deborah Melmon, a member of Park Forest Plus, the group opposing the new hotel.

Melmon said the current proposal places the edge of the three-story building 17 feet from her master bedroom window and living room on Buckthorn Way.

“He’s gone from a hotel that a lot of time and effort was spent on trying to compromise with the neighbors … and suddenly changed it up on us,” she said. “If the Planning Commission votes to approve the plan, we’ll appeal it; if it doesn’t, he will. Either way it’s going to end up at the (City) Council.”

Patel said he is tweaking the proposal to possibly put the parking back underground, though in a less expensive fashion, before going back for possible approval in February.

 

 

Read more on The Mercury News

 

 

San Francisco readies for convention boom as $500 million Moscone Center expansion opens

Nearly two years after it closed for a $550 million renovation, San Francisco’s larger Moscone Center reemerges on Jan. 4, aiming to take the city’s convention business into a new era.

Expanded by 350,000 square feet, Moscone’s north and south wings are now fully connected, creating up to 500,000 square feet of flexible and contiguous convention space and allowing San Francisco to host simultaneous conventions.

For the city’s hospitality industry, which bore the brunt of Moscone’s closure, its return has been a long time coming.

Hotel room bookings, which fell by more than half a million while Moscone was closed, are now set to rebound to an all-time high in 2019. Restaurants and other businesses that feed off the convention trade are eager to eat their fill again. Moscone is expected to attract 175,000 net new visitors annually who will spend a projected $180 million a year and, for the city, generate an additional $20 million in hotel tax.

 

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

 

Downtown San Jose developer drops hotel, apartments from massive Museum Place project

The developer behind Museum Place, a 1.4 million-square-foot downtown San Jose mixed-use development and Tech Museum expansion, is simplifying the project, shedding the previously planned hotel and residential units in the project.

Plans submitted this week to the city of San Jose show that investor and developer Gary Dillabough, who took over the project from Insight Realty earlier this year, is looking to reconfigure the previously approved tower by increasing the office space from 250,000 square feet to 850,000 square feet on the 2.3-acre site at 180 Park Ave., where Parkside Hall currently sits.

“The reality of the situation is that when you are trying to build a hotel, residential space and office, you can’t do all three in a world-class fashion, and our belief is that we want to build a world-class office tower,” Dillabough told the Business Journal in an interview Thursday morning.

That means the previously planned 184-room Kimpton Hotel and the 306 residential units that San Jose-based Insight Realty had gotten approved by the city last year would be no more. The project is now estimated to rise to about 19 stories — down from the currently approved 24 stories — and would still include parking and between 15,000 square feet and 20,000 square feet of retail space on the ground level.

Dillabough, who has become a major property owner in Downtown San Jose over the last year-and-a-half after setting off on a buying spree in the area, says he is still interested in hotel and residential projects in the city, just not at Museum Place.

“We still think the city needs housing and hotel uses, but we think they would be better in standalone buildings,” he said.

Read more on Silicon Business Journal

Crane Watch update: More than 22,000 residential units have flooded into San Jose’s development pipeline

More than 22,000 new residential units have been proposed in the city of San Jose — the largest city in the housing-starved Bay Area — according to city records and Business Journal reporting over the past year.

Those number have been gathered over the past year and a half and detailed in the Silicon Valley Business Journal’s Crane Watch map, which is a compilation of every large development project that has arrived at the San Jose city hall.

When the Silicon Valley Business Journal’s Crane Watch map launched in 2017, it detailed 30 of the biggest projects in San Jose. But a little more than a year later, the number of projects we’re tracking has ballooned to 107 proposals. These include developments that are anywhere in the city’s development pipeline, from an early vision submitted to the city for feedback all the way to a recently completed structure.

Crane Watch shows industrial, office, residential, hotel, health care, education, retail and mixed-use proposals, and active projects that are 90,000 square feet in size or larger throughout the city of San Jose.

Read more on Silicon Valley Business Journal

 

 

 

Exclusive: East Bay’s NewPark Mall pushes plan for 1,500 homes next to stores

As malls across the country struggle to stay afloat in the face of stiff competition from online retailers, NewPark Mall in Newark is pushing ahead on a $1 billion redevelopment project.

Brookfield Retail Properties, which took over NewPark when it acquired the mall’s previous owner, Rouse Properties, in 2016, wants to redevelop the mall and surrounding land into a vibrant community of apartments, parks, hotels, office space and event centers.

“We want to see the mall repositioned to take it to the next level,” said Terrence Grindall, Newark’s assistant city manager.

 

 

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

 

 

With Local Economy Surging, SFO Brings Back Plans for $237MM Hotel

San Francisco International Airport’s new airport-owned and privately managed $237 million Grand Hyatt luxury hotel is on track for a completion date of July 2019.

The deal between SFO and Hyatt gave branding and managing rights to Hyatt, but allows SFO to retain ownership of the property. The airport will finance the $237 million for the hotel’s construction. Groundbreaking for the hotel was held on June 20th of 2017.

No zoning changes were required to accommodate the hotel, which is going up in approximately the same location as the prior hotel, giving up-close views of jumbo jets on the tarmac.

Read more from The Registry