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New effort to push more housing near transit stations by setting state rules

A state bill to allow dense housing near transit stops, alleviating long commutes and coaxing people out of cars, never made it out of committee last session. But backers think the mood has shifted enough in the housing debate to try again.

“I think the political climate is changing,” said state Sen. Scott Wiener, D-San Francisco. He’s the lead sponsor of the More HOMES Act — HOMES stands for Housing, Opportunity, Mobility, Equity and Stability.

“In talking to my colleagues, there’s more support than there was earlier,” Wiener said.

The new iteration, SB50, prevents cities from restricting density within a half mile of a major job center or transit hub, such as a BART or Caltrain station. It raises height limits to 45 feet, about four stories, within a half-mile of the station, and 55 feet or five stories within a quarter mile. It also eliminates minimum parking requirements for new developments, a move that the Board of Supervisors is contemplating for San Francisco.

Those provisions are less dramatic than what Wiener proposed in SB827, his first attempt at statewide zoning reform. It would have barred cities from rejecting four- to eight-story apartment or condo buildings near transit nodes.

Wiener’s first measure laid bare an ideological divide in a state struggling with soaring rents, jammed freeways and a paucity of housing. The crisis has pushed people farther from jobs, forcing them into wildfire zones or soul-grinding commutes, Wiener said. But it has also ignited fears that new development will push out existing residents — or drastically change the landscape. And many opponents bristle at the idea of Sacramento interfering with local governments’ ability to shape their own neighborhoods.

“The issue seems to be that Scott Wiener and his bills are so often looking to undermine local control,” said Susan Kirsch, founder of Livable California, a San Francisco organization that advocates for local urban planning and moderate growth. It opposed SB827.

Political leaders in San Francisco and Berkeley fumed at the building heights in SB827, saying it would allow luxury high-rises to sprout up, unchecked, in quaint residential neighborhoods. San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors passed a resolution against the bill after an emotional hearing in which residents compared it to a “hydrogen bomb” and an “undemocratic power grab.” Some detractors worried that their neighborhoods would be remade to look like Manhattan or Miami Beach.

To other critics, the original bill felt like an unfinished draft. It didn’t do enough to protect tenants from displacement or require affordable housing.

“It felt like it was a big proposal, it was a bold proposal, and there were a lot of details that had not been sufficiently worked out,” said Anya Lawler, a policy advocate for the Western Center on Law and Poverty. The center opposed SB827 but has not taken a position on the new bill.

Yet in the last few months, the tenor of the debate has changed. London Breed was elected mayor of San Francisco on an ardent pro-housing platform — she’s among the politicians tentatively supporting Wiener’s revised legislation. In September, the Legislature passed a law empowering BART to fill station parking lots with homes. And Wiener is seeking an ally in Gov.-elect Gavin Newsom, who emphasized the link between housing and transportation in a post-election speech.

 

 

Read more on SFGate

 

 

 

NAI Northern California Represents $20.5M Sale of Developable Land in Downtown Redwood City

NAI Northern California, the Bay Area presence for NAI Global, the largest commercial real estate brokerage network in the world, is proud to announce the $20.5 million sale of 1180-90 Main Street in Redwood City.

Senior Investment Advisor Kevin Flaherty and Investment Advisor Derrick Reedy represented the seller, Lathrop PARC, LLC, on a lengthy and complicated escrow.

“This is the last piece of undeveloped land of any significance in downtown Redwood City and Premia Capital has a beautiful project they are planning to build. Premia was great to work with and they have a great team leading the charge for entitlements of the 110,000 sq. ft. office building, coming soon,” said Flaherty of NAI Northern California.

The 58,000 sq. ft. parcel of developable office property, in downtown Redwood City, has a 2.0 FAR for the office.

1180 Main Street is located at a key gateway bordering downtown and the El Camino Real corridor, and sits adjacent to the Caltrain corridor. The purposed office building will be designed and located with the intention to revitalize an existing culvert and to create a public park that will be an asset to both the occupants of the building as well as the general public. The outdoor space will be shared with the neighboring residential units.

Flaherty said, “This project will continue the expansion of Redwood City’s downtown office, retail and multi-family world-class real estate. We expect the leasing rate of the new building to rival all major metropolitan areas worldwide.”

About NAI Northern California

NAI Northern California is a full-service commercial real estate firm serving the Northern California Bay Area. Our team delivers technology-enabled commercial real estate services that create value for our clients, industry, and communities.

NAI Northern California is a partner of NAI Global, the largest commercial real estate brokerage network with more than 400 offices worldwide and over 7,000 professionals completing in excess of $20 billion in commercial real estate transactions globally.

Google unveils broad vision for San Jose’s Diridon Station as some community members rally to halt the plans

 

Google announced nearly a year ago that it had visions of a mixed-use campus spanning up to 8 millions square feet in San Jose’s Diridon Station.

Since then, the tech giant has invested heavily in real estate in the area. Google has begun to lay out a high-level vision for San Jose’s Diridon Station area, a 240-acre swath of land around the city’s primary transit hub where the company has dreams of building a massive mixed-use campus.

But barely as Joe Van Belleghem, senior director of development for Google cleared his throat to start a presentation that would outline a framework for long corridors filled with retail, homes, art and a cluster of office buildings, more than a dozen city residents marched in, banner and signs in hand.

“OK now Google, we know you’re bad,” the protesters yelled. “Don’t need you here, we’ve got our own, turn around and go home!”

 

 

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