Facebook to move into big WeWork outpost as co-working company prepares to open largest-ever location

Talks between the two giants about WeWork’s new Mountain View location, its largest sublease to-date, have been ongoing for months. But this week the two finally struck a deal.

When WeWork this year opens its first Mountain View offices — its largest-ever lease — half of that space will be filled by Facebook.

Both companies told the Silicon Valley Business Journal about Facebook’s sublease which totals more than 200,000 square feet in one of two new office buildings at The Village at San Antonio Center. The deal comes after months of discussions between the two companies. The second WeWork office building on the site will be open to any company seeking co-working space.

Initially, the talks between the New York-based co-working company and the Menlo Park-based tech giant had been leading toward Facebook taking over both buildings at 391 and 401 San Antonio Road, which would total about 450,000 square feet, the Business Journal reported in February. But Facebook in recent months has rapidly snapped up huge swaths of office space in Silicon Valley — including about 1 million square feet in Sunnyvale — and its needs evolved quickly, two sources with knowledge of the discussions told the Business Journal.

Facebook will set up shop in the eight-story, approximately 225,000-square-foot office building at 401 San Antonio Rd., which is slated to be ready for move-in by early September, according to WeWork.

Read more from Silicon Valley Business Journal

 

 

Wiener scales back bill that would allow taller housing near public transit

State Sen. Scott Wiener scales back a controversial housing proposal.

The proposed bill would strip local governments of their ability to block construction of taller and denser apartment and condominium buildings near public transit stops, and conceded the bill might not make it through the Legislature this year.

The San Francisco Democrat introduced amendments to his SB827 late Monday that would lower the maximum height of buildings that could go up as a result of the bill to five stories from eight. Also, the bill would take effect in 2021 instead of 2019.

Wiener made the amendments ahead of the bill’s first hearing April 17 in the Senate Transportation and Housing Committee. If passed, the bill will then head to the Senate Governance and Finance Committee.

“The bill is not guaranteed to survive either committee,” Wiener said Tuesday. “It’s a hard bill. Hopefully, we pass through these committees and live to fight another day, but if not, then we will try again next year. It’s very common in the Legislature that for hard bills, sometimes you have to try multiple times.”

The measure would override local height limits on proposed four- and five-story apartment and condo buildings in residential areas if they are within a half mile of major transit hubs, such as a BART or Caltrain station. It also would limit cities’ ability to block denser buildings within a quarter-mile of highly used bus and light-rail stops, but amendments eliminated new height requirements.

Read more from San Francisco Chronicle

 

 

AI is Changing the CRE Game: Here’s 5 Ways

CRE industry leaders using artificial intelligence to analyze and apply data to decision making saw productivity increase of up to 6% compared to competitors.

In a study by Harvard Business Review about the revolution of big data as a management tool, it was found that artificial intelligence used to analyze and apply data to decision making by those at the top of the CRE industry saw an increase of up to 6% in productivity compared to their competitors.

AI is changing the CRE game in several different ways and in turn, having an impact on all CRE sectors in different ways.

Read more from NAI Global