US Neighborhoods with the Best Property ROI

The San Francisco Business Times released this report yesterday after crunching some Zillow numbers, showing the 20 neighborhoods in the US that have delivered the best return on real estate investment in the past 10 years. 

Many of the most lucrative markets lie north of San Jose…right in our wheelhouse. 

Now granted, this list looks at residential real estate. But we’ve all heard that rumor about a rising tide lifting other boats. As the Bay Area and Northern California has grown, it has ALL grown.

Let’s walk through this logically. People want to live in the dynamic City of San Francisco, or near their jackpot job in Silicon Valley. But they don’t want to spend what it costs to live there. So they fan out into the perimeter, raising demand in Richmond, Stockton, Merced.

Well guess what? It’s not just home-buyers in that scenario. It’s renters of multifamily units too. And now those people want shopping centers and auto repair shops and chiropractic offices. 

So if you’re looking for an ideal spot for a commercial investment, you might look at where the people are. Here’s where demand has grown the most.

Want to think about buying or selling in these areas? Consult with one of our advisors. 

Market Pulse: South Bay, August 2019

Welcome to NAI Northern California’s “Market Pulse” feature. We checked the pulse of the South Bay commercial real estate market to discover the ups and downs of the office, industrial, retail, and multifamily markets.  Each market has four dimensions: current inventory, 12-month net absorption, under construction, and vacancy rate.

Check out our August 2019 South Bay Market Pulse infographic. If a dimension is on the rise, the pulse goes above the baseline; if it’s on the decline or negative, the pulse will dip below the baseline.

This month the South Bay office market’s inventory is up to 129 million sq. ft., with 12-month net absorption also up at 2.7 million sq. ft. of office space. Approximately 6.2 million sq. ft. are under construction with an upward trend. The vacancy rate is at 8.3 percent and dropping.

For the industrial market, 198 million sq. ft. of space is in the inventory and rising. The 12-month net absorption is on its way up, at 844,000 sq. ft., and the space under construction is also rising, at 771,000 square feet. The vacancy rate is at 5.7% and trending downward.

There are 79.9 million sq. ft. of retail space available and dropping, with a 12-month net absorption rate of 78,000 sq. ft. (a decreasing trend). More is being built, though, with 1 million sq. ft. under construction. Vacancy rates continue to drop, at 3.3%.

The multifamily market is holding strong, up to 144,000 units available in the inventory. The 12-month net absorption rate is 2,500 units and rising. Construction is on the upswing here, at 1,000 units. The vacancy rate is at 4.3% and dropping.

For more detailed updates or to find out how the South Bay’s submarkets are doing, contact one of our advisors; whether you’re interested in office, industrial, retail, or multifamily properties, we can help.

Market Pulse: South Bay, July 2019

Welcome to NAI Northern California’s “Market Pulse” feature. We checked the pulse of the South commercial real estate market to discover the ups and downs of the office, industrial, retail, and multifamily markets.  Each market has four dimensions: current inventory, 12-month net absorption, under construction, and vacancy rate.

Check out our July 2019 South Bay Market Pulse infographic. If a dimension is on the rise, the pulse goes above the baseline; if it’s on the decline or negative, the pulse will dip below the baseline.

This month the South Bay office market’s inventory is up to 129 million sq. ft., with 12-month net absorption also up at 1.6 million sq. ft. of office space. Approximately 6.4 million sq. ft. are under construction with an upward trend. The vacancy rate is at 8.6 percent and dropping.

For the industrial market, 198 million sq. ft. of space is in the inventory and rising. The 12-month net absorption is on its way up, at 1.1 million sq. ft., and the space under construction is dropping, at 710,000 square feet. The vacancy rate is at 5.6% and trending downward.

There are 80.1 million sq. ft. of retail space available, with a 12-month net absorption rate of 169,000 sq. ft. (a decreasing trend). Less is being built, though, with 1 million sq. ft. under construction. Vacancy rates continue to drop, at 3.4%.

The multifamily market is holding strong, up to 144,000 units available in the inventory. The 12-month net absorption rate is 2,100 units and rising. Construction is on the downswing here, at 10,00 units, with a rising vacancy rate of 4.7%.

For more detailed updates or to find out how the South Bay’s submarkets are doing, contact one of our advisors; whether you’re interested in office, industrial, retail, or multifamily properties, we can help.

Bay Area markets rank in top 5 for most expensive office space in the Americas

Downtown San Francisco and the Peninsula rank #3 and #4 for the most expensive commercial office space on the continent, according to Globe Street and CBRE. For Q1 2019, the cost per square foot per year for prime office space downtown was $130.51, with office space in the Peninsula costing an average of $116.28 per year. New York City still holds the top two slots, with the Midtown-Manhattan and Midtown-South Manhattan markets, and Boston’s Downtown is just behind the Peninsula at $106.60 per sq. ft. per year.

Office space costs in the Americas continue to rise, 3.7% higher than Q1 of last year, and they’re rising faster; Q1 2018 was only 3.2% more expensive than the previous year. Globally, rents for prime office space rose 3.6% compared to 2.5% the year before.

The most expensive office markets worldwide are Hong Kong Central, at $322; London’s West End at $222.70; and Hong Kong Kowloon at $208.67 per sq. ft. per year. Downtown San Francisco and the Peninsula rank 11th and 13th, behind Beijing’s Finance Street, Beijing’s Central Business District, Tokyo, and the City of London.

San Jose and Oakland challenge SF in private equity real estate market

California’s largest cities for real estate investment, San Francisco and Los Angeles, are now being challenged by San Jose and Oakland. California holds almost 20% of the private equity real estate (PERE) in the country and 12% of global PERE assets under management, according to a study by accounting and advisory firm EisnerAmper and Preqin. PERE properties include office buildings (high-rise, urban, suburban and garden offices); industrial properties (warehouse, research and development, flexible office/industrial space); retail properties, shopping centers (neighborhood, community, and power centers); and multifamily apartments (garden and high-rise). Less common but still an option are senior or student housing, hotels, self-storage, medical offices, single-family housing to own or rent, undeveloped land, and manufacturing space (via Investopedia). 

So how do the Bay Area cities compare?

San Francisco’s strength is in its office market, with $3.2 billion PERE deals in 2018 (a $1 billion increase over 2017) and another $1 billion already invested this year as the Bay Area’s largest tech companies continue to expand. The overall PERE total for last year was $4 billion,down from $4.8 billion in 2017; according to an article in the San Francisco Business times, “the drop-off in the quantity of large mixed-use transactions compared with recent years is at the heart of the decrease.” San Francisco is also running out of space, which limits growth.

While San Francisco is still the largest market for office transactions in the Bay Area, San Jose is leading in growth. Their office transactions in 2017 and 2018 both reached $1 billion, with a record in 2018 at $1.2 billion. In Q1 of 2019 alone, these transactions reached $500 million, putting San Jose on track to quadruple its PERE deals this year. The overall PERE total for 2018 was another record of $2.7 billion, almost 60% more than 2017 and a sharp contrast to San Francisco. 

Oakland may be emerging as a competitor, with more reasonable housing options for tenants; the tech company Square announced at the end of last year their intent to move 2,000 employees into an Oakland office. Even as a smaller city, it is on track to reach a total of $1 billion in PERE deals this year, with $560 million in Q1 2019 already; $493 million of that was just two office space deals by Starwood Capital Group. The city also has more Opportunity Zones than either of the other two cities.

With San Francisco as the “benchmark,” San Jose as the “growth leader,” and Oakland as the “up and comer” (according to the SF Business Times), all three cities are going strong.

Source: SF Business Times

 

Tech booms, but small retail struggles in Silicon Valley

While Silicon Valley’s tech sector is thriving, cranking out IPOs and flooding the region with high-paying jobs, its retail industry is struggling to keep its boutiques and tiny mom and pop shops open.

The number of retail businesses — particularly small retail businesses — has dropped significantly in the Bay Area between 2007 and 2017, according to data from the state Economic Development Department. Experts blame a host of factors, including high rents, increased competition from online vendors, a rising minimum wage and increased health care costs.

The average rent per square foot for retail space in San Jose increased nearly 9 percent between 2015 and 2017. It also rose 9 percent in Oakland, and in San Francisco, it inched up almost 5 percent. Even incremental rent hikes can cause trouble for small businesses, which often operate on a thin profit margin.

At the same time, Bay Area home prices and rents have become so expensive that many local retail workers can no longer afford to live near their jobs, forcing them to commute long hours or quit.

Read the full article on The Mercury News

Read our June 11, 2019 newsletter

What’s the hold-up on housing development in the Bay Area?

Bay Area paradox: We need housing, but we don’t want to build faster.

Chronic lawsuits against new Bay Area housing developments. Loud, angry protests against pro-growth legislators and mayors. If the Bay Area has an all-season contact sport, it’s the recurring NIMBY fights against housing construction. And although almost everyone agrees housing prices are too high, few want to see faster development to tackle the problem, according to a recent Bay Area poll for the Silicon Valley Leadership Group and this news organization.

Read more on NAI Northern California’s Newsletter

Which Bay Area neighborhoods are at risk for a major earthquake?

Earthquake map reveals liquefaction risks in Bay Area neighborhoods.

No place in the Bay Area is safe when it comes to the inevitable, devastating earthquakes that loom on the horizon. But some neighborhoods are better situated than others.

Read more on NAI Northern California’s Newsletter

Is Bay Area housing still a sizzling hot housing market?

Even cool, Bay Area housing market is still hot.

The San Jose housing market has cooled more than any other in the country — and it’s still the hottest in the nation, according to a recent Zillow survey. The bidding wars and quick cash sales have abated, and home sellers are cutting prices more often and waiting longer to close deals than a year ago. But middle-income families still struggle to afford the median-priced home of $1.2 million in the San Jose metro area. A typical family needs to put about $600,000 down to fit that mortgage comfortably in their budget.

Read more on NAI Northern California’s Newsletter

 

 

How are there over 100,000 vacant homes in the San Francisco metro area?

An estimated 100,025 homes are sitting empty in the San Francisco metro area.

Compared to other cities, San Francisco metro area’s vacancy rate is actually low at 5.6 percent. Of the 1.784 million households counted in the census region, roughly 1.684 million are occupied. LendingTree concludes a region like San Francisco – which includes Oakland, Hayward and surrounding areas is what’s considered a sellers’ market, meaning people selling their homes will easily find buyers, while future homeowners will struggle to buy. Anyone who has tried to buy a home in the city in the last decade knows this to be true.

Read more on SF Gate