Noel Carrillo joins NAI Northern California as Investment Advisor in San Francisco

NAI Northern California is pleased to announce that Noel Carillo has joined as Investment Advisor in San Francisco. Noel specializes in multifamily properties. He has called San Francisco home for nearly a decade, seeing the City evolve over one of its most transformative eras, and now brings that local awareness to his clients in a manner that transcends the transaction and commits to long-standing relationships through open communication and transparency.

Noel is originally from San Diego and is currently attending City College of San Francisco, where he is pursing his degree in Economics. His professional enthusiasm extends into his personal life where, aside from cherished downtime with friends and family, he pursues adventures like saltwater sportfishing–frequently netting yellowfin, bluefin, and yellowtail tuna–and travels to such far-off locales as Japan, Singapore, and Indonesia.

Learn more about Noel Carillo

Transit-oriented development on the rise

Cities across the Bay Area are opening up to transit-oriented development, building high-density housing with ground-floor retail near BART stations, including on BART-owned land. Despite neighbor complaints, cities are revising their zoning restrictions to allow bigger buildings near major transit hubs.

Most of the development is happening in the East Bay, with completed projects near at least eight stations and more under construction including a 402-unit apartment complex at MacArthur Station with 13,000 square feet of commercial space; 94 units at Fruitvale Station; 200 units at Pleasant Hill Station; 410,000 square feet of commercial space at West Dublin/Pleasanton Station; and 596 units at Walnut Creek Station. Planned projects in Millbrae, West Oakland, Lake Merritt, North Concord/Martinez, Balboa Park, and Fruitvale total over 2,300 units and over 2 million square feet of commercial space.

As zoning codes begin to relax near transit, future development opportunities could open up, strengthening the local markets for existing multifamily buildings as well as retail and office assets.

Source: SF Chronicle

NAI Northern California promotes Trey Sells to Investment Advisor

NAI Northern California, a member of the world’s premier managed network of commercial real estate firms, is pleased to announce the promotion of Trey Sells from Market Analyst to Investment Advisor. Trey specializes in multifamily and mixed-use real estate in the Castro and surrounding areas of San Francisco.

“Trey sets a high standard for exceptional client service and this promotion is well-deserved,” said James Kilpatrick, President of NAI Northern California. “As we look toward the future of NAI, we’d like to acknowledge Trey for his contributions and are confident he will be an asset as we continue to develop and expand.”

Trey has a background in entrepreneurship, education, and personal coaching. He studied neuroscience at Brown University, where he mastered the workings of complex and interconnected systems. After graduating in 2010, he started his own tutoring company and used his extensive and broad education to coach his clients and help them achieve their goals. His career in real estate started with a passion for architecture and beautiful homes; he managed the renovation of a luxury home and, in the process, gained an appreciation for the power of investment to change lives.

Trey is interested in building investment opportunities in real estate leasing. He sees huge potential for the growing advancements in technologies and building materials for real estate to redefine the way we live and invest. His acute attention to detail and extensive network of contacts ensure he can provide the best experience and outcome for his clients.

Trey was born in southern California, where he spent his early childhood, and grew up in northern Nevada near Lake Tahoe. He frequently visits and travels with his family, including his four nieces and nephews. He is very involved in service work for populations in need and values lifelong education and healthy living. He enjoys physical fitness and reading and writing creative fiction. Trey can be found enjoying the outdoors all around the Bay Area or writing in cafes on the streets of the Castro.

How are developers preparing for sea level rise?

The Bay is expected to rise up to 10 feet in the next 80 years; how are local developers protecting their waterfront projects? According to the SF Business Times, “With the right planning, project designs and innovative construction, new developments can not only survive the effects of climate change, but in some cases, can help protect the region from flooding and erosion.”

Depending on what changes the world makes (or doesn’t make) to slow climate change, California estimates that waters will rise 1.1 to 2.7 feet by 2050 and between 2.4 and 10.2 feet by 2100. Most developers and project planners aim to be ready for 2 feet of sea-level rise by 2050 and 6 feet by 2100.

One solution is to truck in dirt to raise the level of the ground before building; Brooklyn Basin, a master-planned community on Oakland’s waterfront, elevated the land 3 feet with this method, and it is also being used on Treasure Island. The Treasure Island development is also using the strategy of siting buildings farther away from the shoreline to allow room for future retaining walls or levies. Terracing is also an option; India Basin and Pier 70 in San Francisco are building homes on sites that already sit well above the water, even if it means they’re a little farther from the waterfront. A more back-to-nature approach is restoring the Bay’s wetlands and marshes, which absorb water and slow flooding.

New developments have many strategies to survive sea level rise, but it remains to be seen how older buildings and infrastructure can be protected. There are currently 48,895 homes in the Bay Area worth a total of $31.8 billion that are at risk of flooding due to sea-level rise, on 48 to 166 square miles of threatened shoreline.

Source: SF Business Times

Cole Byrd joins NAI Northern California as Market Analyst in San Francisco

NAI Northern California is pleased to announce that Cole Byrd has joined as Market Analyst in San Francisco. Cole is training to be an investment advisor, specializing in multifamily properties. Cole was raised in Orlando, FL and Charlotte, NC before making the move to San Francisco. He graduated from the University of San Francisco with a bachelor’s degree in Entrepreneurship and Innovation and began his career in the automotive industry, working for Sonic Automotive and AW Collision Group. NAI Northern California is proud to welcome him to the San Francisco team.

Learn more about Cole Byrd

Market Pulse: San Francisco, August 2019

Welcome to the NAI Northern California’s “Market Pulse” feature. We checked the pulse of the San Francisco commercial real estate market to discover the ups and downs of the office, industrial, retail, and multifamily markets.  Each market has four dimensions: current inventory, 12-month net absorption, under construction, and vacancy rate.

Check out our August 2019 San Francisco Market Pulse infographic. If a dimension is on the rise, the pulse goes above the baseline; if it’s on the decline or negative, the pulse will dip below the baseline.

This month the San Francisco office market’s inventory is up to 176 million sq. ft., with 12-month net absorption at 2.2 million sq. ft. of office space and dropping. Approximately 6.6 million sq. ft. are under construction with an upward trend. The vacancy rate is rising, at 6.2 percent.

For the industrial market, 95 million sq. ft. of space is in the inventory and rising. The 12-month net absorption is at 6,800 sq. ft. and rising. The space under construction is also rising, at 2.5 million square feet. The vacancy rate is at 3.7% and trending upward.

There are 82 million sq. ft. of retail space available, and more coming, with a 12-month net absorption rate of 244,000 sq. ft. heading upward. More is being built, about 433,000 square feet. Vacancy rates have started to drop, at 2.5%.

The multifamily market is holding strong, up to 164,000 units available in the inventory. The 12-month net absorption rate is 2,200 units and rising. Construction is on the upswing here, at 6,200 units, with a decreasing vacancy rate of 3.9%.

For more detailed updates or to find out how San Francisco’s submarkets are doing, contact one of our advisors; whether you’re interested in office, industrial, retail, or multifamily properties, we can help.

Market Pulse: San Francisco, July 2019

Welcome to the first edition of NAI Northern California’s newest feature. We checked the pulse of the San Francisco commercial real estate market to discover the ups and downs of the office, industrial, retail, and multifamily markets.  Each market has four dimensions: current inventory, 12-month net absorption, under construction, and vacancy rate.

Check out our July 2019 San Francisco Market Pulse infographic. If a dimension is on the rise, the pulse goes above the baseline; if it’s on the decline or negative, the pulse will dip below the baseline.

This month the San Francisco office market’s inventory is up to 175 million sq. ft., with 12-month net absorption down at 2 million sq. ft. of office space. Approximately 6.9 million sq. ft. are under construction with an upward trend. The vacancy rate is rising, at 6.3 percent.

For more detailed updates or to find out how San Francisco’s submarkets are doing, contact one of our advisors; whether you’re interested in office, industrial, retail, or multifamily properties, we can help.

San Jose and Oakland challenge SF in private equity real estate market

California’s largest cities for real estate investment, San Francisco and Los Angeles, are now being challenged by San Jose and Oakland. California holds almost 20% of the private equity real estate (PERE) in the country and 12% of global PERE assets under management, according to a study by accounting and advisory firm EisnerAmper and Preqin. PERE properties include office buildings (high-rise, urban, suburban and garden offices); industrial properties (warehouse, research and development, flexible office/industrial space); retail properties, shopping centers (neighborhood, community, and power centers); and multifamily apartments (garden and high-rise). Less common but still an option are senior or student housing, hotels, self-storage, medical offices, single-family housing to own or rent, undeveloped land, and manufacturing space (via Investopedia). 

So how do the Bay Area cities compare?

San Francisco’s strength is in its office market, with $3.2 billion PERE deals in 2018 (a $1 billion increase over 2017) and another $1 billion already invested this year as the Bay Area’s largest tech companies continue to expand. The overall PERE total for last year was $4 billion,down from $4.8 billion in 2017; according to an article in the San Francisco Business times, “the drop-off in the quantity of large mixed-use transactions compared with recent years is at the heart of the decrease.” San Francisco is also running out of space, which limits growth.

While San Francisco is still the largest market for office transactions in the Bay Area, San Jose is leading in growth. Their office transactions in 2017 and 2018 both reached $1 billion, with a record in 2018 at $1.2 billion. In Q1 of 2019 alone, these transactions reached $500 million, putting San Jose on track to quadruple its PERE deals this year. The overall PERE total for 2018 was another record of $2.7 billion, almost 60% more than 2017 and a sharp contrast to San Francisco. 

Oakland may be emerging as a competitor, with more reasonable housing options for tenants; the tech company Square announced at the end of last year their intent to move 2,000 employees into an Oakland office. Even as a smaller city, it is on track to reach a total of $1 billion in PERE deals this year, with $560 million in Q1 2019 already; $493 million of that was just two office space deals by Starwood Capital Group. The city also has more Opportunity Zones than either of the other two cities.

With San Francisco as the “benchmark,” San Jose as the “growth leader,” and Oakland as the “up and comer” (according to the SF Business Times), all three cities are going strong.

Source: SF Business Times

 

How to take advantage of “Opportunity Zones”

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 created new rules for “opportunity zones,” underdeveloped neighborhoods, sheltering your investments from federal taxes with minimal limits and employment requirements. You only have a few more months to maximize the benefits of this program: so how does it work?

When you sell a property, you can immediately reinvest that gain, tax-deferred, into an Opportunity Zone by depositing it into a qualified Opportunity Zone fund (either one you create or a traditional one). Then you have two choices; buy a property in one of the zones, or invest in a business in the zone. We’ll focus on the property option.

You have 31 months to purchase your new property, whether it’s multifamily, retail, industrial, or office space. Eventually, you need to invest the same amount of money as the property’s structures (not land!) currently are worth; if the current building is worth $100,000, you need to spend $100,000 remodeling, rebuilding, or otherwise upgrading the building. This means if you buy a property with a structure worth very little, you don’t have to do much to get the tax benefits.

Speaking of benefits, not only is the tax on your original gains deferred until 2026, but if you hold it for seven years, 15 percent of that gain will completely avoid federal capital gains taxes. (You only get 10 percent if you hold it for five years.) And if you hold it for ten years and your new investment appreciates? None of that appreciation is taxable under federal capital gains taxes. This is an opportunity indeed!

There are 102 opportunity zones designated around the Bay Area, including in Oakland, Concord, San Rafael, Santa Rosa, and even San Francisco; visit the SF Business Times’ site for maps and stats about the zones, or contact one of our advisors to find a property that matches your investment goals.

Sources: BizJournals.com, Tax Policy Center

Read our June 25, 2019 newsletter

Housing development and building pipeline up to a record high in San Francisco

In San Francisco in 2019 the overall pipeline of housing being developed hit a record 72,865 units, up over 5,050 from Q1 2018.

The number of units in developments which are currently under construction and should be ready for occupancy within the next year or two has increased, from 8,100 at the end of last year to 8,500 in the Q1 2019, which is within 3 percent of the current cycle peak of 8,800 set in Q3 2015.

Around 16,800 permitted and approved units are in play, while some major housing projects in Treasure Island, Park Merced, and Candlestick area.

Read more on Socket Site