Yeah but what does a private Walgreen’s mean to *property* investors? 

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Word is out this week that Walgreen’s is exploring the possibility of going private. The now-public drugstore chain is working with investment bank Evercore Partners to gauge interest from large private equity firms in footing the roughly $55 billion bill. That would make it the largest leveraged buyout ever.

Walgreen’s has a history of valuing its business privacy — particularly with regards to its prescription sales numbers — and for being at odds with Wall Street scrutiny. The market has battered them this year, pushing stock down 28% in the past 12 months. This move is thought to be prompted by management’s vision to be more autonomous with their strategies and partnerships.

Last week in this newsletter we pondered some numbers around the “retail apocolypse,” and discovered that the Amazon Effect isn’t so much killing brick-n-mortar stores, it’s just reshaping the live retail offering. Walgreen’s is a prime example of this, and while they’ve taken an  Amazon hit, they’re re-aligning in a way that is taking their physical stores in a positive direction.

Walgreen’s has pilot projects and tests with companies like the grocer Kroger, Microsoft, and primary care providers like Humana’s Partners in Primary Care and VillageMD, a developer of primary care clinics. This makes them less reliant on “Amazonable” products like shampoo, while creating revenue from real-time, location-centric services.

And they’ve announced plans to close 200 stores in this streamlining effort, which can sound ominous to property owners leasing to the chain. But these stores are all clearly declining and unprofitable locations, and removing that dead weight actually makes their other locations more valuable.

The conclusion here is that this news makes the investment market for Walgreens properties hotter than usual — Walgreens stock has jumped 6% on the news.

Under our NAI roof here, our overall highest-producing broker over the last several years also happens to specifically be a Walgreen’s expert. Senior VP Mary Alam, working with Investment Advisor CJ Brill, generally covers our retail channels here at NAI NorCal. And within that work, several transactions for both buyers and sellers of Walgreen’s-leased properties have crossed their desks.

The team very recently closed a deal here in the SF Bay Area, as well as representing locations in California’s Central Valley, Sacramento and South Carolina. And they have multiple off-market Walgreen’s options right now. And if you’re looking nationwide, we’ve also got Managing Director Joby Tapia representing a Walgreen’s property in Atlanta, in contract with contingencies removed.

ALL of these properties are the kind of high-traffic, high-performing, market-leading locations that Walgreen’s invests more into while they trim elsewhere. So contact us today if you’re interested in moving on this news while the ink is still wet… 

 

A little perspective on the retail apocalypse

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Our friends at the listing and research platform CoStar have released another interesting report on the impending retail apocalypse.

The Amazon Effect, and the societal retreat into robotic Instagrat lifestyles, is turning 2019 into the heaviest year ever for retail store closures. However. If you read between the lines, you see that while more stores are closing, less square footage is involved.

More than 10,000 stores have announced a closure this year, almost twice last year, and 3,000 more than during the downturn in 2008. Yet while last year saw 155 million square feet close, this year that space is down roughly 30%.

So it appears the Sears, Kmarts, JCPenneys, and similar anchor tenants of yesteryear have gone through their New Economy purge, and now it’s time for the GNCs, Gymborees and Payless stores. E-commerce has its sights on 10,000 sqft and under this year.

But more importantly, these numbers do NOT show a death knell for retail. It’s really more of a cleansing and realigning. Deliverable retail goods — those that can’t be offered via a better user experience than direct-to-your-door convenience — are taking their mid-/small-/boutique stores down. But! There’s growth in the Un-Amazonable.

This includes personal services, restaurants, grocery/drug stores, fitness and sports, healthcare, and even movies and entertainment outlets. These retail establishments are all showing a healthy upward trend.

So. If you have a retail property — or you’re in the market to invest in one — but you’re uncertain about what tenants are promising and which might be at risk, then talk to us.

US Neighborhoods with the Best Property ROI

The San Francisco Business Times released this report yesterday after crunching some Zillow numbers, showing the 20 neighborhoods in the US that have delivered the best return on real estate investment in the past 10 years. 

Many of the most lucrative markets lie north of San Jose…right in our wheelhouse. 

Now granted, this list looks at residential real estate. But we’ve all heard that rumor about a rising tide lifting other boats. As the Bay Area and Northern California has grown, it has ALL grown.

Let’s walk through this logically. People want to live in the dynamic City of San Francisco, or near their jackpot job in Silicon Valley. But they don’t want to spend what it costs to live there. So they fan out into the perimeter, raising demand in Richmond, Stockton, Merced.

Well guess what? It’s not just home-buyers in that scenario. It’s renters of multifamily units too. And now those people want shopping centers and auto repair shops and chiropractic offices. 

So if you’re looking for an ideal spot for a commercial investment, you might look at where the people are. Here’s where demand has grown the most.

Want to think about buying or selling in these areas? Consult with one of our advisors. 

Noel Carrillo joins NAI Northern California as Investment Advisor in San Francisco

NAI Northern California is pleased to announce that Noel Carillo has joined as Investment Advisor in San Francisco. Noel specializes in multifamily properties. He has called San Francisco home for nearly a decade, seeing the City evolve over one of its most transformative eras, and now brings that local awareness to his clients in a manner that transcends the transaction and commits to long-standing relationships through open communication and transparency.

Noel is originally from San Diego and is currently attending City College of San Francisco, where he is pursing his degree in Economics. His professional enthusiasm extends into his personal life where, aside from cherished downtime with friends and family, he pursues adventures like saltwater sportfishing–frequently netting yellowfin, bluefin, and yellowtail tuna–and travels to such far-off locales as Japan, Singapore, and Indonesia.

Learn more about Noel Carillo

Transit-oriented development on the rise

Cities across the Bay Area are opening up to transit-oriented development, building high-density housing with ground-floor retail near BART stations, including on BART-owned land. Despite neighbor complaints, cities are revising their zoning restrictions to allow bigger buildings near major transit hubs.

Most of the development is happening in the East Bay, with completed projects near at least eight stations and more under construction including a 402-unit apartment complex at MacArthur Station with 13,000 square feet of commercial space; 94 units at Fruitvale Station; 200 units at Pleasant Hill Station; 410,000 square feet of commercial space at West Dublin/Pleasanton Station; and 596 units at Walnut Creek Station. Planned projects in Millbrae, West Oakland, Lake Merritt, North Concord/Martinez, Balboa Park, and Fruitvale total over 2,300 units and over 2 million square feet of commercial space.

As zoning codes begin to relax near transit, future development opportunities could open up, strengthening the local markets for existing multifamily buildings as well as retail and office assets.

Source: SF Chronicle

NAI Northern California promotes Trey Sells to Investment Advisor

NAI Northern California, a member of the world’s premier managed network of commercial real estate firms, is pleased to announce the promotion of Trey Sells from Market Analyst to Investment Advisor. Trey specializes in multifamily and mixed-use real estate in the Castro and surrounding areas of San Francisco.

“Trey sets a high standard for exceptional client service and this promotion is well-deserved,” said James Kilpatrick, President of NAI Northern California. “As we look toward the future of NAI, we’d like to acknowledge Trey for his contributions and are confident he will be an asset as we continue to develop and expand.”

Trey has a background in entrepreneurship, education, and personal coaching. He studied neuroscience at Brown University, where he mastered the workings of complex and interconnected systems. After graduating in 2010, he started his own tutoring company and used his extensive and broad education to coach his clients and help them achieve their goals. His career in real estate started with a passion for architecture and beautiful homes; he managed the renovation of a luxury home and, in the process, gained an appreciation for the power of investment to change lives.

Trey is interested in building investment opportunities in real estate leasing. He sees huge potential for the growing advancements in technologies and building materials for real estate to redefine the way we live and invest. His acute attention to detail and extensive network of contacts ensure he can provide the best experience and outcome for his clients.

Trey was born in southern California, where he spent his early childhood, and grew up in northern Nevada near Lake Tahoe. He frequently visits and travels with his family, including his four nieces and nephews. He is very involved in service work for populations in need and values lifelong education and healthy living. He enjoys physical fitness and reading and writing creative fiction. Trey can be found enjoying the outdoors all around the Bay Area or writing in cafes on the streets of the Castro.

How are developers preparing for sea level rise?

The Bay is expected to rise up to 10 feet in the next 80 years; how are local developers protecting their waterfront projects? According to the SF Business Times, “With the right planning, project designs and innovative construction, new developments can not only survive the effects of climate change, but in some cases, can help protect the region from flooding and erosion.”

Depending on what changes the world makes (or doesn’t make) to slow climate change, California estimates that waters will rise 1.1 to 2.7 feet by 2050 and between 2.4 and 10.2 feet by 2100. Most developers and project planners aim to be ready for 2 feet of sea-level rise by 2050 and 6 feet by 2100.

One solution is to truck in dirt to raise the level of the ground before building; Brooklyn Basin, a master-planned community on Oakland’s waterfront, elevated the land 3 feet with this method, and it is also being used on Treasure Island. The Treasure Island development is also using the strategy of siting buildings farther away from the shoreline to allow room for future retaining walls or levies. Terracing is also an option; India Basin and Pier 70 in San Francisco are building homes on sites that already sit well above the water, even if it means they’re a little farther from the waterfront. A more back-to-nature approach is restoring the Bay’s wetlands and marshes, which absorb water and slow flooding.

New developments have many strategies to survive sea level rise, but it remains to be seen how older buildings and infrastructure can be protected. There are currently 48,895 homes in the Bay Area worth a total of $31.8 billion that are at risk of flooding due to sea-level rise, on 48 to 166 square miles of threatened shoreline.

Source: SF Business Times

Cole Byrd joins NAI Northern California as Market Analyst in San Francisco

NAI Northern California is pleased to announce that Cole Byrd has joined as Market Analyst in San Francisco. Cole is training to be an investment advisor, specializing in multifamily properties. Cole was raised in Orlando, FL and Charlotte, NC before making the move to San Francisco. He graduated from the University of San Francisco with a bachelor’s degree in Entrepreneurship and Innovation and began his career in the automotive industry, working for Sonic Automotive and AW Collision Group. NAI Northern California is proud to welcome him to the San Francisco team.

Learn more about Cole Byrd

Market Pulse: North Bay, August 2019

Welcome to NAI Northern California’s “Market Pulse” feature. We checked the pulse of the North Bay commercial real estate market to discover the ups and downs of the office, industrial, retail, and multifamily markets.  Each market has four dimensions: current inventory, 12-month net absorption, under construction, and vacancy rate.

Check out our August 2019 North Bay Market Pulse infographic. If a dimension is on the rise, the pulse goes above the baseline; if it’s on the decline or negative, the pulse will dip below the baseline.

This month the North Bay office market’s inventory is at 40.7 million sq. ft. and holding flat, with 12-month net absorption down at 127,000 sq. ft. of office space. Approximately 17.2 million sq. ft. are under construction with an upward trend. The vacancy rate is at 7.4 percent and expected to drop.

For the industrial market, 105 million sq. ft. of space is in the inventory, with more on the way. The 12-month net absorption is heading up, at 231,000 sq. ft., and the space under construction is also rising, at 1.1 million square feet. The vacancy rate is at 3.4% and holding steady.

There are 65.6 million sq. ft. of retail space available and rising, with a 12-month net absorption rate at 113,000 sq. ft. (a decreasing trend). More is being built, though, with 72,000  sq. ft. under construction. Vacancy rates continue to rise, at 3.7%.

The multifamily market is up to 59,000 units available in the inventory. The 12-month net absorption rate averages just 52 units across the North Bay area and is dropping. Construction is on the upswing here, at 557 units, with a rising vacancy rate of 5.4%.

For more detailed updates or to find out how the North Bay’s submarkets are doing, contact one of our advisors; whether you’re interested in office, industrial, retail, or multifamily properties, we can help.

Market Pulse: South Bay, August 2019

Welcome to NAI Northern California’s “Market Pulse” feature. We checked the pulse of the South Bay commercial real estate market to discover the ups and downs of the office, industrial, retail, and multifamily markets.  Each market has four dimensions: current inventory, 12-month net absorption, under construction, and vacancy rate.

Check out our August 2019 South Bay Market Pulse infographic. If a dimension is on the rise, the pulse goes above the baseline; if it’s on the decline or negative, the pulse will dip below the baseline.

This month the South Bay office market’s inventory is up to 129 million sq. ft., with 12-month net absorption also up at 2.7 million sq. ft. of office space. Approximately 6.2 million sq. ft. are under construction with an upward trend. The vacancy rate is at 8.3 percent and dropping.

For the industrial market, 198 million sq. ft. of space is in the inventory and rising. The 12-month net absorption is on its way up, at 844,000 sq. ft., and the space under construction is also rising, at 771,000 square feet. The vacancy rate is at 5.7% and trending downward.

There are 79.9 million sq. ft. of retail space available and dropping, with a 12-month net absorption rate of 78,000 sq. ft. (a decreasing trend). More is being built, though, with 1 million sq. ft. under construction. Vacancy rates continue to drop, at 3.3%.

The multifamily market is holding strong, up to 144,000 units available in the inventory. The 12-month net absorption rate is 2,500 units and rising. Construction is on the upswing here, at 1,000 units. The vacancy rate is at 4.3% and dropping.

For more detailed updates or to find out how the South Bay’s submarkets are doing, contact one of our advisors; whether you’re interested in office, industrial, retail, or multifamily properties, we can help.