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Exclusive: $75 million renovation, office conversion proposed at San Francisco’s biggest shopping mall

Westfield San Francisco Centre, the city’s largest shopping center, could see a $75 million makeover and partial office space conversion. 

Mall landlords Westfield Corp. and Forest City Realty Trust Inc. proposed this week a renovation of tenant spaces, a new facade with more glass, and three new outdoor terraces for the 865 Market St. portion of the property. The companies also want to convert existing retail, storage and meeting space into 49,999 square feet of office space on the seventh and eighth floors. The proposal requires approval from the City Planning Commission.

Numerous retail spaces in the Bay Area and elsewhere are seeking to convert to office amid turmoil in the shopping sector.

 

Read more from San Francisco Business Times

 

 

Details and Timing for Mission Bay Ferry and Water Taxi Service

San Francisco’s future Mission Bay Ferry Landing could be operational as early as 2021.

If the Port’s plans are approved as proposed, and the water is broken and dredging commences in mid-2019 as currently envisioned, San Francisco’s future Mission Bay Ferry Landing near the intersection of Terry A. Francois Boulevard and 16th Street, cater-corner to Chase Center and adjacent to the future Bayfront Park, could be now operational as early as the first quarter of 2021, as newly rendered below.

A proposed Water Taxi Landing, which is to be located approximately 400 feet south of the proposed Ferry Landing, adjacent to Agua Vista Park, could be operational six months earlier (August 2020).

And in addition to peak hour services to and from Alameda-Oakland, Vallejo and potentially Larkspur, linked via San Francisco’s Ferry Building terminal, special event services would be provided for all scheduled Golden State Warriors’ games and around 20 other big evening or weekend events at the Chase Center.

 

Read more from SocketSite

 

 

How to Find Continued Value in Apartment Acquisitions

With concessions ticking up and rent growth slowing, is it time to question or finetune allocation levels and strategies in multifamily investing?

The stability, durability and continued capital flows into multifamily investing permeate today’s headlines, with industry pundits believing apartments to be the most popular product type with real estate investors in 2018, second only to industrial. Mixed signals abound among varying markets, and it’s important to dissect and triangulate the real data as the analytics don’t always tell the full story.

A first quarter report from Fannie Mae cited:

  • Positive, but slowing net absorption in 2018 compared with 2017 (CoStar)
  • Surging apartment development, peaking at over 440,000 units nationwide and up 16 percent from 2017 (Dodge Data & Analytics)
  • Rising nationwide vacancy rate predicted to approach recent historical average of six percent by year-end (Fannie Mae)

With concessions ticking up and rent growth slowing, is it time to question or finetune allocation levels and strategies in multifamily investing? Two principal factors are worthy of consideration here: geography and investment horizon.

Nationally, development is projected to keep pace with net absorption, as Fannie Mae projects net rental demand of 380,000 to 460,000 units in 2018. However, parsing geographies more discerningly reveals that new multifamily construction has been heavily concentrated in America’s largest cities, where pockets of oversupply are projected. New York, Boston, Washington, D.C., Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco present some of the highest unit construction per capita in the country, yet are all projected by Moody’s Analytics to experience job growth in 2018 that lags the national forecast of 1.5 percent.

All markets do not bear these metrics though, especially in select secondary markets where Fannie Mae reports the ratio of projected population and employment growth to rising apartment inventory is more favorable. Cities such as Houston, Dallas, Austin, Texas, Salt Lake City and Portland, Ore., even while seeing brisk construction, are forecast to increase job growth between two to three percent amid continued rental escalation. Two markets worth investigating include Phoenix, where projected 2.6 percent employment growth forecasts the demand for 10,000 units against projected 2018 delivery of 8,000 units, and Las Vegas, where projected 2018 absorption is double the number of units under construction.

Development nationwide should peak in 2018, as planned units in comparison to those under construction taper off, even in cities with the most active pipelines. This suggests that investors with a longer hold horizon may see their patience rewarded when new supply is absorbed and vacancy rates level off. Several long-term demographic trends also bode well for multifamily absorption and rental rates:

  • Householders continue to delay marriage and childbirth, thus tending to remain in apartments
  • Population growth in many areas, particularly in the Southwest, is being fueled by immigrants who tend to be renters
  • Real household income growth is occurring only in the upper 20 percent of earners, rendering home ownership less affordable for many
  • Student loan debt, which doubled as a percentage of GDP between 2006 and 2012, stymies home ownership for younger households
  • Conversely, the 65+ baby boomer generation, America’s most rapidly growing domestic cohort, is demanding more rental housing as they age out of owned homes and reevaluate their investment and retirement options

In our view, investors who choose their geographies wisely and take a long-game approach should see their properly selected multifamily investments buoyed by these market and demographic trends, while enjoying relatively predictable cash flows in the interim.

Read more from National Real Estate Investor

 

The only one in the room: How the Bay Area’s real estate industry is grappling with diversity (Video)

Many in the commercial real estate industry often find themselves “the only one in the room” who is different.

White males still dominate in many professional settings in commercial real estate and especially in the executive ranks. While the tech industry has come under intense scrutiny for a lack of diversity in its workforce and investing millions into addressing the problem, commercial real estate has largely received a pass.

How to Move the Needle on Diversity

Industry groups including CREW, NAIOP, the Urban Land Institute and the Building Owners and Managers Association are looking at how to address the lack of diversity.

The San Francisco chapter of BOMA has been working with San Francisco State University, where the study body is more than 70 percent female and/or people of color, on a certificate program in real estate for finance majors and a fellowship program that places students in internships and provides mentorship.

Many commercial real estate executives say diversifying their staffs is a top priority. here are some best practices employees shared:

“Creating a diversity task force or committee to help steer recruiting and operations policies to be more inclusive and sensitive can be effective. Adding a diversity liaison and incorporating diversity goals into company culture and core values is key. The latter takes time and commitment. Supporting groups that help boost women such as CREW and other groups within the industry is also important.”

James Kilpatrick, President
NAI Northern California, a commerical brokerage firm

 

Read more from San Francisco Business Times

 

 

San Francisco evictions in decline, less than two-thirds of state average

Only half of eviction notices lead to actual ouster, according to Princeton database

San Francisco landlords evict tenants at less than two-thirds the rate of the average California city.

That’s the conclusion from Princeton University’s recently launched Eviction Lab, which compiles data from 48 states and Washington DC to get a bird’s-eye view of what eviction in the U.S. looks like. In 2016, Princeton recorded roughly 2.3 million evictions coast to coast, around one per every 140 citizens.

Compared to that, California’s rate of one eviction per 933 residents—41,178 evictions total in 2016—looks almost rosy; however, it’s not wise to use those kinds of terms when talking about tens of thousands of people losing their homes.

And in San Francisco the news is even more potentially comforting for renters. A few takeaways from the data:

  • Eviction Lab reports 593 SF evictions the same year, one per every 1,417 people (Eviction Lab uses an estimated SF population of 841,000 for 2016, which is actually on the low side), a rate of about 63.5 percent of the state average.
  • The database also records some 1,176 eviction filings the same year, meaning that the success rate of attempted evictions in SF was just over 50 percent. In the rest of the state it was more than 87 percent.
  • Overall, California had 112.51 evictions per day in 2016. SF had just 1.62, or just less than 1.44 percent of the state eviction rate.
  • Although Eviction Lab records a median rent in SF more than $300 pricier than the state average, the city’s median income also outstripped California average by over $19,000.

Before uncorking the champagne, note that there are some discrepancies between Princeton’s and San Francisco’s data sets.

Read more from Curbed SF

 

 

 

Huge investors chase San Francisco’s $300 million Ferry Building

The 1889 building is drawing interest from some of the country’s biggest landlords.

Some of the country’s biggest real estate investors want to buy control of San Francisco’s iconic Ferry Building in a deal that could exceed $300 million.

Kilroy Realty Corp, Hudson Pacific Properties In.c, Invesco Plc, and Thor Equities, are all competing to acquire the building, according to five, sources. A buyer could be selected within a month, said the sources.

The pending deal is another sign of San Francisco’s enduring appeal for major office investors as rents have jumped and little supply is being added.

The 1889 Ferry Building at the eastern terminus of Market Street includes 175,000 square feet of office space and 65, 000 square feet of retail in a popular ground-floor marketplace. The building and its weekly farmer’s markets draw tens of thousands of visitors a week. Its office space with waterfront views also commands some of the highest rents in the city, up to $100 per square feet.

Read more from San Francisco Business Times 

 

 

San Francisco’s largest office landlord to break ground on $265 million Oakland tower

Boston Properties, San Francisco’s largest office landlord, will break ground on May 2 on a 402-unit apartment tower next to Oakland’s MacArthur BART station.

The 260-foot project at 532 39th St. will be the tallest building in North Oakland and the company’s first residential project on the West Coast.

The project in the Temescal district will be among a half-dozen Oakland towers to start construction in the last two years, an unprecedented real estate boom that’s drawing some of the country’s biggest developers to the city. Other developers include Lennar Multifamily Communities, Shorenstein Properties and Carmel Partners.

Read more from San Francisco Business Times

 

 

Facebook to move into big WeWork outpost as co-working company prepares to open largest-ever location

Talks between the two giants about WeWork’s new Mountain View location, its largest sublease to-date, have been ongoing for months. But this week the two finally struck a deal.

When WeWork this year opens its first Mountain View offices — its largest-ever lease — half of that space will be filled by Facebook.

Both companies told the Silicon Valley Business Journal about Facebook’s sublease which totals more than 200,000 square feet in one of two new office buildings at The Village at San Antonio Center. The deal comes after months of discussions between the two companies. The second WeWork office building on the site will be open to any company seeking co-working space.

Initially, the talks between the New York-based co-working company and the Menlo Park-based tech giant had been leading toward Facebook taking over both buildings at 391 and 401 San Antonio Road, which would total about 450,000 square feet, the Business Journal reported in February. But Facebook in recent months has rapidly snapped up huge swaths of office space in Silicon Valley — including about 1 million square feet in Sunnyvale — and its needs evolved quickly, two sources with knowledge of the discussions told the Business Journal.

Facebook will set up shop in the eight-story, approximately 225,000-square-foot office building at 401 San Antonio Rd., which is slated to be ready for move-in by early September, according to WeWork.

Read more from Silicon Valley Business Journal

 

 

Exclusive: FivePoint suspends work on 635,000-square-foot shopping mall at the former Candlestick Park

The mall was meant to be the centerpiece of the 280-acre project, one of San Francisco’s largest.

The shopping centerpiece of San Francisco’s 280-acre Candlestick Point development has been suspended amid turmoil in the retail industry, placing one of the city’s largest projects in jeopardy.

Developer FivePoint Holdings LLC and its retail partner Macerich Co. paused work on the 635,000-square-foot mall, according to a Thursday email to the project team obtained by the San Francisco Business Times.

FivePoint said in recent SEC filings that “in light of the rapidly evolving retail landscape,” it was “evaluating the viability of a mall” and “exploring potential alternative configurations of the site.” FivePoint said future plans were uncertain.

The mall was to span over a dozen buildings, bounded by Harney Way, Arelious Walker Way and Ingerson Avenue. It was approved along with 7,200 housing units, a 200-room hotel, and an additional 300,000 square feet commercial space. Infrastructure construction is underway at Candlestick, but no new buildings have started construction and design work is ongoing.

The mall was meant to revitalize the former home of the San Francisco 49ers and Giants, who played at Candlestick Park for four decades. The stadium was demolished in 2014, the same year that the mall project was unveiled and originally set to open in late 2017.

Read more from San Francisco Business Times

 

 

WeWork signs biggest lease of Q1 in San Francisco

WeWork just added 251K SF to its San Francisco footprint.

The co-working provider inked the city’s largest lease of the first quarter at the Union Bank Building with landlords Kennedy Wilson and Takenaka Corp., the San Francisco Business Times reports. WeWork signed an 18-year lease for all 20 floors and plans to renovate the building.

The JV bought the building at 400/430 California St. in 2016 for $135M when it was fully leased to MFUB Union Bank, which plans to vacate the building.

The co-working company began occupying it newest location this year at Salesforce Tower, where it leases 75K SF. WeWork has rapidly expanded its Bay Area footprint in recent years and signed leases for over 1M SF in 2017. It also has expanded into Oakland, San Jose and Mountain View within the last two years.

WeWork Managing Director for U.S. and Canada West Jon Slavet told the San Francisco Business Times that the company cannot keep up with demand in the Bay Area, where its community is now over 13,000 members. Its members range from startups to enterprise businesses.

WeWork plans to open its first phase at 430 California during Q1 2019.

Read more from Bisnow