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San Francisco evictions in decline, less than two-thirds of state average

Only half of eviction notices lead to actual ouster, according to Princeton database

San Francisco landlords evict tenants at less than two-thirds the rate of the average California city.

That’s the conclusion from Princeton University’s recently launched Eviction Lab, which compiles data from 48 states and Washington DC to get a bird’s-eye view of what eviction in the U.S. looks like. In 2016, Princeton recorded roughly 2.3 million evictions coast to coast, around one per every 140 citizens.

Compared to that, California’s rate of one eviction per 933 residents—41,178 evictions total in 2016—looks almost rosy; however, it’s not wise to use those kinds of terms when talking about tens of thousands of people losing their homes.

And in San Francisco the news is even more potentially comforting for renters. A few takeaways from the data:

  • Eviction Lab reports 593 SF evictions the same year, one per every 1,417 people (Eviction Lab uses an estimated SF population of 841,000 for 2016, which is actually on the low side), a rate of about 63.5 percent of the state average.
  • The database also records some 1,176 eviction filings the same year, meaning that the success rate of attempted evictions in SF was just over 50 percent. In the rest of the state it was more than 87 percent.
  • Overall, California had 112.51 evictions per day in 2016. SF had just 1.62, or just less than 1.44 percent of the state eviction rate.
  • Although Eviction Lab records a median rent in SF more than $300 pricier than the state average, the city’s median income also outstripped California average by over $19,000.

Before uncorking the champagne, note that there are some discrepancies between Princeton’s and San Francisco’s data sets.

Read more from Curbed SF

 

 

 

Huge investors chase San Francisco’s $300 million Ferry Building

The 1889 building is drawing interest from some of the country’s biggest landlords.

Some of the country’s biggest real estate investors want to buy control of San Francisco’s iconic Ferry Building in a deal that could exceed $300 million.

Kilroy Realty Corp, Hudson Pacific Properties In.c, Invesco Plc, and Thor Equities, are all competing to acquire the building, according to five, sources. A buyer could be selected within a month, said the sources.

The pending deal is another sign of San Francisco’s enduring appeal for major office investors as rents have jumped and little supply is being added.

The 1889 Ferry Building at the eastern terminus of Market Street includes 175,000 square feet of office space and 65, 000 square feet of retail in a popular ground-floor marketplace. The building and its weekly farmer’s markets draw tens of thousands of visitors a week. Its office space with waterfront views also commands some of the highest rents in the city, up to $100 per square feet.

Read more from San Francisco Business Times 

 

 

San Francisco’s largest office landlord to break ground on $265 million Oakland tower

Boston Properties, San Francisco’s largest office landlord, will break ground on May 2 on a 402-unit apartment tower next to Oakland’s MacArthur BART station.

The 260-foot project at 532 39th St. will be the tallest building in North Oakland and the company’s first residential project on the West Coast.

The project in the Temescal district will be among a half-dozen Oakland towers to start construction in the last two years, an unprecedented real estate boom that’s drawing some of the country’s biggest developers to the city. Other developers include Lennar Multifamily Communities, Shorenstein Properties and Carmel Partners.

Read more from San Francisco Business Times

 

 

Facebook to move into big WeWork outpost as co-working company prepares to open largest-ever location

Talks between the two giants about WeWork’s new Mountain View location, its largest sublease to-date, have been ongoing for months. But this week the two finally struck a deal.

When WeWork this year opens its first Mountain View offices — its largest-ever lease — half of that space will be filled by Facebook.

Both companies told the Silicon Valley Business Journal about Facebook’s sublease which totals more than 200,000 square feet in one of two new office buildings at The Village at San Antonio Center. The deal comes after months of discussions between the two companies. The second WeWork office building on the site will be open to any company seeking co-working space.

Initially, the talks between the New York-based co-working company and the Menlo Park-based tech giant had been leading toward Facebook taking over both buildings at 391 and 401 San Antonio Road, which would total about 450,000 square feet, the Business Journal reported in February. But Facebook in recent months has rapidly snapped up huge swaths of office space in Silicon Valley — including about 1 million square feet in Sunnyvale — and its needs evolved quickly, two sources with knowledge of the discussions told the Business Journal.

Facebook will set up shop in the eight-story, approximately 225,000-square-foot office building at 401 San Antonio Rd., which is slated to be ready for move-in by early September, according to WeWork.

Read more from Silicon Valley Business Journal

 

 

Exclusive: FivePoint suspends work on 635,000-square-foot shopping mall at the former Candlestick Park

The mall was meant to be the centerpiece of the 280-acre project, one of San Francisco’s largest.

The shopping centerpiece of San Francisco’s 280-acre Candlestick Point development has been suspended amid turmoil in the retail industry, placing one of the city’s largest projects in jeopardy.

Developer FivePoint Holdings LLC and its retail partner Macerich Co. paused work on the 635,000-square-foot mall, according to a Thursday email to the project team obtained by the San Francisco Business Times.

FivePoint said in recent SEC filings that “in light of the rapidly evolving retail landscape,” it was “evaluating the viability of a mall” and “exploring potential alternative configurations of the site.” FivePoint said future plans were uncertain.

The mall was to span over a dozen buildings, bounded by Harney Way, Arelious Walker Way and Ingerson Avenue. It was approved along with 7,200 housing units, a 200-room hotel, and an additional 300,000 square feet commercial space. Infrastructure construction is underway at Candlestick, but no new buildings have started construction and design work is ongoing.

The mall was meant to revitalize the former home of the San Francisco 49ers and Giants, who played at Candlestick Park for four decades. The stadium was demolished in 2014, the same year that the mall project was unveiled and originally set to open in late 2017.

Read more from San Francisco Business Times

 

 

WeWork signs biggest lease of Q1 in San Francisco

WeWork just added 251K SF to its San Francisco footprint.

The co-working provider inked the city’s largest lease of the first quarter at the Union Bank Building with landlords Kennedy Wilson and Takenaka Corp., the San Francisco Business Times reports. WeWork signed an 18-year lease for all 20 floors and plans to renovate the building.

The JV bought the building at 400/430 California St. in 2016 for $135M when it was fully leased to MFUB Union Bank, which plans to vacate the building.

The co-working company began occupying it newest location this year at Salesforce Tower, where it leases 75K SF. WeWork has rapidly expanded its Bay Area footprint in recent years and signed leases for over 1M SF in 2017. It also has expanded into Oakland, San Jose and Mountain View within the last two years.

WeWork Managing Director for U.S. and Canada West Jon Slavet told the San Francisco Business Times that the company cannot keep up with demand in the Bay Area, where its community is now over 13,000 members. Its members range from startups to enterprise businesses.

WeWork plans to open its first phase at 430 California during Q1 2019.

Read more from Bisnow

 

 

San Francisco and Oakland Rents Inch up but Remain below Peak

Having ended last year lower than where they started, asking rents for apartments in San Francisco have inched up around one percent over the past two months, in part due to the typical seasonality in rents.

And in fact, based on a comparison of roughly 2,600 listings, the weighted average asking rent for an apartment in San Francisco, including one-off rentals as well as units in larger developments, is currently running around $4,100 a month, which is 0.9 percent lower versus the same time last year and 8.5 percent below its peak in the fourth quarter of 2015 with the average asking rent for a one-bedroom still running around $3,400 a month having ticked down from around $3,650.

At the same time, the weighted average asking rent for an apartment in Oakland is currently running around $2,450 a month which is 0.5 percent higher than at the same time last year but still 18 percent lower than a mid-2016 peak with the average asking rent for a one-bedroom still running around $2,100 a month, which remains around 40 percent cheaper than in San Francisco.

Read more from SocketSite

 

 

Central SoMa Plan Could Add 11 Stories To Pinterest’s HQ

If the city moves forward with an ambitious plan to guide office and housing development in Central SoMa, Pinterest hopes to add a vertical 11-story addition to its headquarters at 505 Brannan St.

A proposal filed by TMG Partners, one of the original six-story building developers, includes an 11-story addition that would add 165,000 square feet to the site and bring its height to 240 feet.

The current building offers 129,450 square feet in office space and is 85 feet tall, but the site is permitted for a structure 250 feet tall, according to SF Planning documents.

The addition is anticipated to cost $38 million.

Read the full article from Hoodline

Why WeWork is giving away free office space in S.F. and 10 other cities

After more than tripling its Bay Area footprint last year, WeWork is now ramping up its philanthropic efforts.

The co-working startup is providing free office space for 10 entrepreneurs who are military veterans for six months in San Francisco and 10 other cities. The program, Veterans in Residence, is a partnership with BUnker Labs, a Chicago-based nonprofit incubator for veterans. It’s the first time WeWork has provided free space in multiple cities through a national program.

In WeWork’s 25 Taylor St. office in the Tenderloin, a 10-seat office that is normally priced at $5,800 per month is now operated by Bunker Labs. In the country’s most expensive office market, it’s a rare offering of new, free space.

Finding affordable office space is “incredibly expensive. It’s time-consuming. It’s difficult,” said Mike Nemke, a former member of the U.S. Army Special Forces who served in the Middle East and joined the veterans program. Nemke is co-founder of a data science startup, Datamyne.ai, and MKTR.ai, which provides marketing and consulting to other startups.

Read more from San Francisco Business Times

 

 

Dorm living for professionals comes to San Francisco

The middle-class backbone of San Francisco is looking to move into dorms.

In search of reasonable rent, the middle-class backbone of San Francisco — maitre d’s, teachers, bookstore managers, lounge musicians, copywriters and merchandise planners — are engaging in an unusual experiment in communal living: They are moving into dorms.

Shared bathrooms at the end of the hall and having no individual kitchen or living room is becoming less weird for some of the city’s workers thanks to Starcity, a new development company that is expressly creating dorms for many of the non-tech population.

Starcity has already opened three properties with 36 units. It has nine more in development and a wait list of 8,000 people. The company is buying a dozen more buildings (including one-star hotels, parking garages, office buildings and old retail stores), has raised $18.9 million in venture capital and hired a team of 26 people. Starcity said it was on track to have hundreds of units open around the San Francisco Bay Area this year, and thousands by 2019.

Read more from The New York Times