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SF considers barring offices from Union Square ground floor

Supervisor Aaron Peskin’s plan would reserve shopping district spaces for retail.

At Tuesday’s Board of Supervisors meeting, Supervisor Aaron Peskin made a bid to squeeze big-ticket office space out of the Union Square shopping district, introducing new legislation that would reserve ground floor space in Union Square for retail establishments.

“Office space is in high demand and frankly out competes retail and threatens those spaces currently occupied by retailers,” said Peskin, citing the plight not just of shopping hubs around Union Square but also the likes of “tailors, design professionals, and life sciences.”

 

 

Read more on Curbed SF

 

BART picks developers for huge housing and office development at Lake Merritt in Oakland

Bay Area Regional Transit officials selected a development team to revamp three city blocks above the Lake Merritt BART Station in Oakland.

The agency picked Strada Investment Group and the East Bay Asian Local Development Corp. to develop 1.4 acres into two high-rise towers with 519 homes and 517,000 square feet of commercial space.

EBALDC is one of Oakland’s top nonprofit housing developers with 27 communities in the city. San Francisco-based Strada has owned multiple office buildings in downtown Oakland and has developed multiple projects in various Bay Area cities.

The winning team beat out proposals from global real estate investor Hines, Menlo Park-based Lane Partners and a partnership of Oakland-based McGrath Properties Inc. and Canadian investor Brookfield Residential. Lane Partners came in second, according to a BART staff report.

The BART board will formally vote to select the Strada/EBALDC Team at its meeting Thursday and start a two-year exclusive negotiating agreement to finalize the project. if the two sides fail to negotiate a project in that time frame, BART could then give Lane Partners a shot without having to do another selection process.

BART has wanted to develop its land above the Lake Merritt Station for years. The goal is to boost BART ridership and attract more residents, businesses, and pedestrians to a relatively quiet stretch of Oakland nestled between the city’s core downtown and the lake.

 

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

 

 

 

Co-working space costs nearly 15% more than office space, study says. Is it worth it?

More than 1.7 million people will work in co-working spaces by the end of 2018, according to the Global Coworking Survey, and a staggering 29 percent of such spaces were opened over the last year.

Growth of this new workplace trend is most impressive in San Francisco, the city of seemingly infinite startups, many of which aren’t large enough to warrant an office space, but too big for the CEO’s living room.

San Francisco has 51.45 co-working spaces for every 100,000 people — more than any other city in the country — according to a new survey from business development tool SimpleTexting. The study compiled data from Yelp, the U.S. Census Bureau and multiple office-space rental websites.

The cost of co-working space for a single employee is actually more expensive than traditional office space, by about $400 a year in San Francisco, the study found. A years-long co-working pass in the city is about $4,572, compared to $4,200 in an office. Nationally, co-working rent costs an average 14.8 percent more per employee than traditional office space.

 

 

 

Read more on SF Gate

 

 

Exclusive: East Bay’s NewPark Mall pushes plan for 1,500 homes next to stores

As malls across the country struggle to stay afloat in the face of stiff competition from online retailers, NewPark Mall in Newark is pushing ahead on a $1 billion redevelopment project.

Brookfield Retail Properties, which took over NewPark when it acquired the mall’s previous owner, Rouse Properties, in 2016, wants to redevelop the mall and surrounding land into a vibrant community of apartments, parks, hotels, office space and event centers.

“We want to see the mall repositioned to take it to the next level,” said Terrence Grindall, Newark’s assistant city manager.

 

 

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

 

 

Facebook breaks ground on community hub devoted to nonprofits

Facebook will soon break ground on its latest development, but this time the social media company isn’t building offices — it is creating a nonprofit community hub.

The 12K SF community hub will provide much-needed space for nonprofits educating the community and youth about tech and coding. It is expected to open in early 2019.

Large tech companies and organizations have been devoting community spaces for nonprofits and events as part of their campus or office developments. Salesforce has devoted the top floor of Salesforce Tower, the ohana floor, for community and nonprofit events after hours. Google opened a free 8,500 SF workspace for nonprofits at its Embarcadero office in 2017.

Large tech companies and organizations have been devoting community spaces for nonprofits and events as part of their campus or office developments. Salesforce has devoted the top floor of Salesforce Tower, the ohana floor, for community and nonprofit events after hours. Google opened a free 8,500 SF workspace for nonprofits at its Embarcadero office in 2017.

Facebook’s Menlo Park Community Hub will be for local nonprofits focused on internships and workforce training, coding and technology courses and community development. The space is reservable for nonprofits, entrepreneurs and community events when not used for classes.

 

 

Read more on Bisnow Silicon Valley

 

 

Sneak peek: Office Depot debuts co-working space in Los Gatos store

Office Depot is piloting its first-ever co-working space inside a retail store at its Los Gatos location.

The move comes as the office supplies retailer looks to edge in on co-working giants like WeWork by offering workspace for freelancers, small business owners and remote workers.

The space inside the store at 15166 Los Gatos Blvd. is called Workonomy Hub.

Much like WeWork, Workonomy offers options ranging from renting a desk in a common area ($40 per day) to private offices ($750 per month). The space also includes high-speed Internet, free refreshments, business services like printing, shipping and mail and package handling, and, of course “easy access to office supplies.”

“The combination of Office Depot’s current suite of products and services with a physical co-working space creates a comprehensive offering for small business owners, entrepreneurs and remote employees under one roof,” the company said in a statement.

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

Getting downtown ‘right’ in San Jose has been a trial-and-error process

The plan for San Jose’s downtown is years old. What’s new is that Google has bought into that vision.

The critical challenge of getting things right in the next iteration of downtown San Jose has been a hot issue at least since the 1980s, when downtown was torn up and many businesses suffered and died during construction of the Valley Transportation Authority’s light rail system.

Downtown’s future was a central focus of the thousands of people who participated in the four years of work that in 2011 produced the city’s latest general plan, Envision San Jose 2040, that anticipated Diridon’s status as a transit hub amidst 40,000 new jobs.

“This is not a novel idea we just came upon because Google came around last year,” Mayor Sam Liccardo said.

Kim Walesh, San Jose’s deputy city manager and economic development director, said the plan always envisioned “having an anchor developer who would do a cohesive master planned development in that central area.”

That doesn’t mean, however, that latest round of planning efforts and community engagement sparked by Google’s development announcement last year has pleased everyone who will be affected by what happens around Diridon.

 

 

Read more on Silicon Valley Business Journal

 

 

 

WeWork brings its newest office model to San Francisco to chase mid-size companies

WeWork is putting a twist on its co-working model with HQ, a new concept aimed at medium-sized companies that offers more privacy.

Co-working space operator WeWork is bringing a new concept aimed at medium-sized companies to San Francisco.

The fast-growing company eased 17,500 square feet in 800 Market St. for its first location of the new model, known as HQ, outside of New York City.

WeWork’s HQ is geared toward businesses with 11 to 250 employees that need office space, but don’t want to sign a traditional lease or don’t need the common areas the company provides in its co-working location.

“Since launching HQ By WeWork, we have been inundated with inquiries from businesses looking for private, flexible, cost-efficient spaces that allow them to reflect their identity,” said David Fano, the company’s chief growth officer, in a statement. “San Francisco was the obvious next destination.”

The company already runs six HQ locations in New York totaling more than 400,000 square feet, with the goal of reaching 1 million square feet within the next year.

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

 

 

Tech tenants continue to compete for limited Silicon Valley office space

The Silicon Valley office market continues to perform well, with tech tenants quickly grabbing up space, particularly larger blocks that are hard to come by in the tight market.

The recent 274K SF lease by Roku at Coleman Highline reflects the strength of the San Jose market. Google’s plans for an 8M SF campus in San Jose have driven a lot of activity in that city’s downtown.

But even beyond a bustling San Jose, the greater Silicon Valley office market has had strong fundamentals for the first half of the year, according to Savills Studley.

In Q2, there was more than 2.6M SF of office leased in Silicon Valley, adding up to 5.8M SF leased in the past 12 months, Savills Studley reports. Availability in the core markets of Menlo Park, Palo Alto and Sunnyvale/Cupertino remains in the single digits, while the region’s overall availability has decreased to 15.8%, down 130 basis points from a year ago.

At the same time, rents are rising, reaching $50.94 overall asking rent for the region in Q2, up 4%. Class-A rents were up 1.7% to $52.51. Tech tenants continue to drive the market.

 

Read more on Bisnow Silicon Valley

 

 

 

As San Jose boosts job growth, the challenge will be where to house new employees

With the potential for Google to add around 15,000 employees at its planned 8M SF Google Transit Village, San Jose is presented with an ongoing challenge: How can a city grow jobs in a largely undersupplied housing market?

In the next 10 years, San Jose will benefit from more development and have a vastly different skyline, but also increase its population.

“We’re just going to have more humans,” Swenson Senior Director Josh Burroughs said during Bisnow’s Silicon Valley State of the Market event Thursday. “I think that’s the biggest change.”

He said in the next 10 years, downtown and the immediate area around Diridon and Midtown from Valley Fair and Santana Row to Downtown will be more crowded with people.

The current pipeline has 6,000 units nearing or waiting for entitlement with 4,000 units under construction.

“There is a demand for those 10,000 units today,” Burroughs said. “If Google builds and adds 15,000 employees where are they going to live? We have a constant need for housing.”

In addition to the impact Google would have on the multifamily market, panelists discussed rising interest in the North San Jose and Milpitas office and mixed-use market and the benefits of investing in those markets. The Bisnow event was held at DivcoWest’s Century Plaza office complex in Foster City.

Swenson is currently working on a 260-unit off-campus student housing project near San Jose State University. Burroughs said what makes the project naturally affordable is that students pay by the bedroom instead of by the unit.

One of the biggest challenges developers and cities face is ongoing opposition to much-needed housing.

 

Read more on Bisnow Silicon Valley