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New 155K SF Affordable Housing Project Planned Near S.F.’s Balboa Park BART Station

A new development that will bring more affordable housing to San Francisco is underway next to the Balboa Park BART station.

The 155K SF transit-oriented development, Balboa Park Upper Yard, will deliver up to 120 units of low- and very-low-income housing in a mixed-use project that will have community-serving space. There will be open space on a connected piece of property owned by BART.

The project from neighborhood nonprofit Mission Housing Development Corp. and developer Related California is in the design phase, and construction could start in late 2019 or early 2020. Mithun is the project architect.

Projects such as this one help Mission Housing better serve residents, particularly low-income Latino residents who have been displaced from one district of San Francisco into another, according to the organization. As it has watched residents pushed out of the city’s District 9 in the Mission District, Mission Housing has been looking at expanding into the Excelsior area in District 11 where those residents are moving, and eventually the entire west side of San Francisco.

“We are thrilled to have been given the opportunity to deliver more high quality, affordable housing to District 11,” Mission Housing Executive Director Sam Moss said in a statement. Mission Housing owns or manages 38 housing properties and is one of the area’s largest nonprofit housing organizations. “The community outreach, planning, design, financing, and construction will lead to delivering the excellent affordable housing and community services hub which the people of San Francisco deserve.”

The creation of 100% affordable housing is the biggest tool available to combat gentrification, Mission Housing officials said. They said the new site is expected to benefit from a piece of legislation now in progress for a citywide neighborhood preference that would make 45% of units specifically designated for families that currently live near the project.

 

Read more on Bisnow San Francisco

 

 

Crane Watch update: More than 22,000 residential units have flooded into San Jose’s development pipeline

More than 22,000 new residential units have been proposed in the city of San Jose — the largest city in the housing-starved Bay Area — according to city records and Business Journal reporting over the past year.

Those number have been gathered over the past year and a half and detailed in the Silicon Valley Business Journal’s Crane Watch map, which is a compilation of every large development project that has arrived at the San Jose city hall.

When the Silicon Valley Business Journal’s Crane Watch map launched in 2017, it detailed 30 of the biggest projects in San Jose. But a little more than a year later, the number of projects we’re tracking has ballooned to 107 proposals. These include developments that are anywhere in the city’s development pipeline, from an early vision submitted to the city for feedback all the way to a recently completed structure.

Crane Watch shows industrial, office, residential, hotel, health care, education, retail and mixed-use proposals, and active projects that are 90,000 square feet in size or larger throughout the city of San Jose.

Read more on Silicon Valley Business Journal

 

 

 

Walnut Creek housing project near BART beats back appeal

The developer is a frequent face at Walnut Creek’s Planning Department, and will responsible for constructing more than 900 new housing units around the downtown BART station.

A Walnut Creek housing proposal cemented approval last night after the City Council voted to quash an appeal.

Danville-based developer Blake Griggs’ now has a clear line of sight for its 1910 Noma project, which includes 135 units of housing and 10,000-square-feet of retail about a block away from the Walnut Creek BART station.

Lauren Seaver, Blake Griggs’ vice president of development, said it expects to break ground sometime within the next six to twelve months. Fuddruckers restaurant now occupies the site, but would temporarily leave and then move back into 4,000 square feet of retail space once the site is rebuilt. Seaver said tenants for the remaining 6,000 square feet have not yet been chosen.

A local union, the Laborers International Union of North America, was behind the appeal and cited inadequate environmental reviews. Unions have frequently appealed East Bay housing projects on environmental grounds when they’ve had disagreements with developers over the use of union labor.

The Laborers International Union of North America did not respond to requests for comment.

Walnut Creek Senior Planner Gregg Kapovich said the union could still sue, but as of now, no more appeals are possible.

 

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

 

 

 

Exclusive: East Bay’s NewPark Mall pushes plan for 1,500 homes next to stores

As malls across the country struggle to stay afloat in the face of stiff competition from online retailers, NewPark Mall in Newark is pushing ahead on a $1 billion redevelopment project.

Brookfield Retail Properties, which took over NewPark when it acquired the mall’s previous owner, Rouse Properties, in 2016, wants to redevelop the mall and surrounding land into a vibrant community of apartments, parks, hotels, office space and event centers.

“We want to see the mall repositioned to take it to the next level,” said Terrence Grindall, Newark’s assistant city manager.

 

 

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

 

 

Sneak peek: Office Depot debuts co-working space in Los Gatos store

Office Depot is piloting its first-ever co-working space inside a retail store at its Los Gatos location.

The move comes as the office supplies retailer looks to edge in on co-working giants like WeWork by offering workspace for freelancers, small business owners and remote workers.

The space inside the store at 15166 Los Gatos Blvd. is called Workonomy Hub.

Much like WeWork, Workonomy offers options ranging from renting a desk in a common area ($40 per day) to private offices ($750 per month). The space also includes high-speed Internet, free refreshments, business services like printing, shipping and mail and package handling, and, of course “easy access to office supplies.”

“The combination of Office Depot’s current suite of products and services with a physical co-working space creates a comprehensive offering for small business owners, entrepreneurs and remote employees under one roof,” the company said in a statement.

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

Oakland to vote on property tax, owner move-in eviction measures

Oakland voters in November will be deciding on three new measures.

The three new measures include a tax on vacant properties, increase the real estate transfer tax rate for properties worth more than $2 million and disallow landlords from evicting tenants on the grounds that the landlord lives in the property.

The vacant property tax, which must pass by a two-thirds majority, would impose a special parcel tax on all vacant property — including lots, industrial and commercial buildings, and units in apartment buildings and other multi-unit buildings like condo or townhouse complexes.

The measure was passed during Tuesday’s marathon city council meeting which lasted into the early morning hours of Wednesday. Landlords spoke out against the measures, mostly claiming they would put an unfair burden on small “mom-and-pop” landlords who may only have one rental property and rely on that income. Tenants’ rights activists supported the measures, and shared stories of landlords treating tenants unfairly, as well as the need for housing.

 

 

Read more on East Bay Times

 

 

 

What WeWork’s retail debut says about the state of retail

The company that’s shaking up office markets just took a major step into retail.

WeWork recently launched a new business concept, dubbed WeMRKT, at the co-working giant’s 205 Hudson location in New York City. WeMRKT is a small shop that sells products created by WeWork members, and while there’s currently only one location, WeWork said it plans to expand the concept nationally.

WeWork’s decision to step into retail comes at a turning point in the market. From Toys R Us to Nine West, retailers across the country are filing for bankruptcy at record levels as consumer shopping habits continue to shift.

But not all retailers are struggling. Discount shops are booming while retailers who effectively employ creative, omnichannel strategies are finding success.

WeWork’s new concept is another step in retail’s evolution. From the fusing of the office and retail sectors to new opportunities for brick-and-mortar, here’s what WeWork’s foray into retail says about the current state of the market.

 

 

Read more on Apto

 

 

 

Young couples and retirees ditch the city for a new kind of suburb

The term “surban” describes a suburban community that offers the conveniences of urban life.

John Burns Real Estate Consulting trademarked the word in 2016. Urban planners have long described a marriage of residential and commercial as “mixed-use” communities. This surban concept, while not novel, has been gaining popularity over the past few years.

Chris Porter, chief demographer at John Burns, said it’s a no-brainer option for many Americans, especially younger couples without kids and empty nesters. Surban communities are often near transit hubs and also have amenities like boutique fitness options, high-quality grocery stores and popular restaurants.

“It’s about lifestyle. There’s this idea that urban environments traditionally don’t have great public schools and the suburban environments do. That’s why you actually see a lot of families, once they start to have kids, moving to the suburbs for school quality. You’ve got lower crime in suburban areas than you would have in urban areas. In urban areas you have walkability and public transportation… bringing some of those things to the suburbs in small downtown areas is really the concept that we see — the concept of surban,” he said in a new podcast.

Projects like Irvine Spectrum, a mega outdoor shopping mall with a residential village adjacent to it, and San Jose’s Santana Row, which brands itself as a “small town feel inside the big city,” are cropping up across California.

City Place in Edgewater, New Jersey, which has luxury apartments sitting above stores like Anthropologie, is right next to a multiplex cinema. Developers are even investing in teacher’s villages that offer the best of both urban and suburban worlds.

Read more on Yahoo Finance

 

 

Housing for North Berkeley BART?

BART and city leaders recently took the first steps toward a mixed-use housing development on the station’s parking lots, but there’s still a long road ahead.

In its early days, BART bulldozed houses to build massive parking lots for commuters to San Francisco, devastating several low-income communities in the East Bay. But then in the mid-1990s, the transit agency started a shift toward building housing, office, and retail around its stations instead. And during the past 15 years or so, the agency has been planning developments at most of its stations with surface parking lots — including projects at Ashby station in Berkeley and at most of its above-ground Oakland stations.

But the stations surrounding some of BART’s most desirable real estate have been excluded from development planning so far. For example, despite high home prices around the Rockridge BART station in North Oakland and the fact that it’s only a 20-minute ride to downtown San Francisco, BART has produced no development plans for the area to date.

For North Berkeley, a 25-minute ride from San Francisco, BART has at least considered building on the land. An overview of BART’s transit-oriented development strategy provided to this reporter last year included a map of existing, planned, and future development. North Berkeley was listed as a site for potential future development with 100-percent affordable housing, but BART had no more specific plans than that.

Read more from East Bay Express

 

 

SF Planning To Consider Proposed Mixed-Use Development At Market And Duboce

Developers of a proposed eight-story, mixed-use building at the intersection of Market and Duboce streets are seeking approval today for plans to utilize the state’s density bonus by including on-site affordable housing units.

The project at 1965 Market St., as proposed by Keller Grover Properties, LLC, would utilize the California State Density Bonus Law to exceed the site’s 50-foot height limit.

The project sponsor is the law firm housed in the building currently on site.

Read more from Hoodline