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Downtown San Jose developer drops hotel, apartments from massive Museum Place project

The developer behind Museum Place, a 1.4 million-square-foot downtown San Jose mixed-use development and Tech Museum expansion, is simplifying the project, shedding the previously planned hotel and residential units in the project.

Plans submitted this week to the city of San Jose show that investor and developer Gary Dillabough, who took over the project from Insight Realty earlier this year, is looking to reconfigure the previously approved tower by increasing the office space from 250,000 square feet to 850,000 square feet on the 2.3-acre site at 180 Park Ave., where Parkside Hall currently sits.

“The reality of the situation is that when you are trying to build a hotel, residential space and office, you can’t do all three in a world-class fashion, and our belief is that we want to build a world-class office tower,” Dillabough told the Business Journal in an interview Thursday morning.

That means the previously planned 184-room Kimpton Hotel and the 306 residential units that San Jose-based Insight Realty had gotten approved by the city last year would be no more. The project is now estimated to rise to about 19 stories — down from the currently approved 24 stories — and would still include parking and between 15,000 square feet and 20,000 square feet of retail space on the ground level.

Dillabough, who has become a major property owner in Downtown San Jose over the last year-and-a-half after setting off on a buying spree in the area, says he is still interested in hotel and residential projects in the city, just not at Museum Place.

“We still think the city needs housing and hotel uses, but we think they would be better in standalone buildings,” he said.

Read more on Silicon Business Journal

Major S.F. tech company eyes one of Oakland’s largest vacant office buildings

San Francisco-based fintech Square Inc. has eyed Oakland for a big lease, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

The payments processing company reportedly looked at Uptown Station, a 356,000-square-foot refurbished, mixed-use building that is one of the largest blocks of office space available in Oakland.

“There are large tech tenants looking at Uptown, but none have landed yet,” Edward Del Beccaro, a managing director of Transwestern, told the Chronicle.

Landlord CIM Group has been chasing tenants for the space since it bought the building in December 2017 for $180 million. The approximately $40 million renovation of Uptown Station by Truebeck Construction is expected to finish early next year.

CIM picked up the property at 1955 Broadway from Uber Technologies, which had planned to move up to 2,000 employees into the space, but decided to consolidate in San Francisco instead.

Square has been on a growth tear as of late. Over the summer, it added 104,100 square feet to its San Francisco headquarters at 1455 Market St. for a total of 469,000 square feet there. It is also growing outside the Bay Area and internationally.

In addition to Uptown Station, Oakland has a handful of similar historic rehabs, including projects from TMG Partners and Harvest Properties.

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

More move to modular construction to mitigate costs, but it’s not the solution for every project.

In an effort to shorten construction timelines to cut down on costs and find creative ways around the shortage of skilled labor, multifamily developers have embraced the possibilities of modular construction.

But as with any new technology, there are still a lot of pitfalls and issues to work out before it becomes a solution for everyone — and it is not a solution for every project.

The move to modular is being driven by a combination of desperation and fear of the future, Panoramic Interests owner Patrick Kennedy said last week at Bisnow’s Multifamily Annual Conference NorCal in San Francisco.

“Conventional methods seem untenable in many circumstances,” he said.

Ultimately, construction costs will just get higher and more developers across markets will look at modular to address costs and the labor shortage.

 

 

Read more on Bisnow SF

 

 

 

Are food halls a magic elixir for retail owners?

The concept of the food hall has taken deep root in U.S. retail properties, with scores up and running and hundreds in the pipeline.

Though a popular addition for struggling retail properties, celebrity chef Todd English said that without the right approach, food halls are not always the solution for owners. English spoke at the recent Second Annual International Council of Shopping Centers-Baruch College Real Estate Conference, as reported by Real Estate Weekly.

He warned that some food halls are merely “glorified food courts with better options.” He further called food halls a WeWork model, a kind of coworking space that “has to be about more than just food.”

Food halls are a draw because of their perceived authenticity, as local eateries, healthier options and craft breweries edge out standard food court fare (fast food, that is).

While not every food hall is going to feature chef-curated or otherwise expensive options, they have to be creative in some way, English said during the ICSC conference. “It’s not just another great turkey sandwich or croissant, or whatever the latest trend is, it’s something that brings people in.”

For retailers, a successful food hall is thus not a matter of simply setting up a food hall. With the increasing number of food halls, they too need to stand out to be competitive.

 

 

Read more on Bisnow

 

Is Silicon Valley going to change the way we build CRE?

From the end of World War II in the mid-1940s until just a few years ago, there was a surge in productivity throughout the United States economy, giving rise to what has often been called the “productivity miracle.”

Throughout this period, nearly every industry in the US — from retail to manufacturing to agriculture — became not only less expensive, but also much more mechanized and faster, leading to increased efficiency.

One industry, however, failed to come on board with this trend – construction. In fact, productivity in construction has not only not increased, but it is also actually lower today than it was in the late 1960’s.

In other words, the way that most commercial real estate buildings are built hasn’t changed much in the last 50 years or so. The process goes by the name “design – bid – build” – but it isn’t nearly as simple or straightforward as it sounds. First, the developer or owner needs to hire an architect, who drafts a rough design. In order to do this, he or she must bring in various outside consultants, such as structural engineers and landscape architects. Next, the owner puts the design out for bids from various general contractors and then hires one (usually the least expensive bid). From there, the general contractor subcontracts the work out, with the architect and the general contractor working together closely to make sure the project is completed as close as possible to budget and on schedule.

If the system sounds complicated, well, that’s because it is. Having so many cooks in the kitchen, so to speak, often leads to misunderstandings, placing blame on others, or worse. The combination of volatile prices for materials and an observed shortage of skilled labor has created an industry that is primed for disruption.

 

 

Read more on NAI Global

 

 

 

‘Monster in the Mission’ housing proposal back in new form, but with same old opposition

The developer behind a long-stalled mixed-use apartment complex above the 16th Street BART Station in the Mission District has a new plan, but so far it is being met with the same staunch opposition as previous iterations.

Maximus Real Estate Partners, which owns the 57,000-square-foot site at the southeast corner of 16th and Mission streets, has filed a revised design that calls for two 10-story market-rate buildings — one on Mission Street and one on 16th Street — totaling 285 units, as well as 46 affordable units arranged in a row of five-story townhomes along Capp Street.

The affordable units would be given to the city, and the rents spun off from that building, roughly $1.15 million a year, could be used to help subsidize rents in other nearby buildings in the rapidly gentrifying area.

The revised project, designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, also scales back some aspects of the project, which critics have long dubbed the “Monster in the Mission.”

The 163-unit mid-rise on Mission Street would be moved back 15 feet to expand the usable space on the BART plaza by 40 percent. The three buildings would each have a district architectural style — one green tile, one red brick and one wood — to break up the massing and better fit into the character of surrounding buildings, project architect Leo Chow said.

 

 

Read more on SFGate

 

 

Identifying lucrative value-add multifamily opportunities as the cycle lengthens

There are ways to drive returns on value-add multifamily investments without spending a fortune on redevelopment.

The appetite for value-add multifamily investments remains strong—and in light of this increasing competition, many investors are struggling to identify and secure assets that present high-reward opportunities.

While some investors have turned to extreme measures, including taking on projects that require extensive remediation and complete overhauls—or even repurposing entirely different product types for multifamily use—some of the greatest opportunities for growth and stability lie in strategically identifying and refreshing functional, yet under-managed vintage communities.

 

 

Read more on National Real Estate Investor

 

 

NAI Northern California represents $10.45M sale of Fruitvale Gateway Building in Oakland

Oakland, CA – October 29, 2018 – NAI Northern California, the Bay Area presence for NAI Global and the largest commercial real estate brokerage network in the world, is proud to announce the $10.45 million sale of the Fruitvale Gateway Building in Oakland.

The Mitchell Warren Team, including Vice President Kent Mitchell and Senior Investment Advisor Tim Warren, and Principal Grant Chappell represented both the Buyer and Seller of this transaction.

“We worked for over a year to get this done. We never stopped pursuing leads and supporting multiple escrow efforts until the right buyer closed,” said Mitchell.

The acquisition of the two-acre, eight-story office tower includes more than an acre of land remaining for development. Centrally located with easy access to various transportation points including Fruitvale BART station and interstate freeways, this transaction offers the Buyer a rare development opportunity for increased rental options or a new type of property.

The Fruitvale Gateway Building is a strongly-occupied 50,008 square foot office building located on International Boulevard in the Fruitvale District of Oakland. Historically, the property has benefited from strong rental demand from a diverse tenant background, due in part to its close proximity to various amenities and the high quality of space it provides.

 

About NAI Northern California

NAI Northern California is a full-service commercial real estate firm serving the Northern California Bay Area. Our team delivers technology-enabled commercial real estate services that create value for our clients, industry, and communities.

NAI Northern California is a partner of NAI Global, the largest commercial real estate brokerage network with more than 400 offices worldwide and over 7,000 professionals completing in excess of $20 billion in commercial real estate transactions globally.

 

To learn more, visit nainorcal.com.

Bay Area blazes hit multifamily buildings

A late-night fire destroyed an under-development East Bay multifamily complex Monday night, hours after the San Francisco Fire Department got a fire in a downtown high-rise under control.

A West Oakland fire, which was first reported around 2 a.m. at West Grand Avenue and Filbert Street, burned six buildings under construction on the site — two that were near completion and four in early stages of construction, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. The project developer is City Ventures, which was planning 126 condos on the site.

Nearby residents were evacuated and power was cut off as a precautionary measure.

Another fire at a building on a construction site on the 3600 block of Peralta Street in the early morning hours was quickly extinguished, the Chronicle reports. The fire department is looking into the cause, which was deemed suspicious.

Monday evening, a 25-story building at 405 Davis Court in San Francisco’s Financial District caught fire, burning on the 12th through 16th floors.

No one was injured in the fire, which was first reported shortly after 5 p.m., according to the San Francisco Fire Department. While there were no injuries, multiple people had to be rescued. The cause of the fire is being investigated.

The fire burned for about 45 minutes.

 

 

Read more on Bisnow SF

 

 

 

SF considers ban on rent hikes for widows, widowers

Under existing state law, the death of a loved one may be followed by a mortal rent hike on a rent-controlled home.

On Tuesday, Supervisor Hillary Ronen announced that she will introduce a new law that would extend rent-control protections to bereaved family members—but only if California passes Proposition 10 in November.

Ronen’s office notes in a Tuesday press release:

As Costa Hawkins is currently written, landlords are free to raise the rent on a rent-controlled apartment to an unlimited amount when the “original occupant” no longer lives there.

The San Francisco Rent Ordinance is drafted to mirror that. So, any family members who were not original occupants—no matter how long they’ve lived in the home—are completely unprotected.

Ronen cites examples of Mission District residents who faced rent hikes of 300 to 700 percent after the deaths of their partners. She says that under the new legislation, which will be introduced at today’s Board of Supervisors meeting, the city would “extend the protections on rent-controlled units to spouses and family members” post-mortem.

Note that the announcement promises protections will extend to “nontraditional families” including domestic partners.

Under Ronen’s proposal, bereaved partners would only need to illustrate at least two years of occupancy to dodge a post-funeral rent hike.

 

 

Read more on Curbed SF