WeWork takes last vacancy in San Mateo development near Caltrain

The lease marks the co-working company’s first foray into San Mateo and the mid-Peninsula and comes on the heels of plans to open a second location in downtown San Jose.

WeWork is filling in the gaps of its footprint between San Francisco and San Jose, this week announcing it will take over the last of the remaining vacancy at a San Mateo office development recently completed by developer Hines.

The coworking company plans to move into about 96,000 square feet on four floors at 400 Concar Drive, one of two buildings in Hines’ 400/450 Concar creative office complex steps away from the Hayward Park Caltrain Station.

The 305,000-square-foot development has stood 70 percent leased since it was completed in early 2017. The lone tenant in the complex has been software maker Medallia, which in 2016 signed a lease for all 210-115-square-feet at 450 Concar. Now, the veritable co-working giant WeWork has staked a claim to an entire building in the complex, where it will offer 1,650 desks when it opens its doors in December.

“WeWork members all over the Bay Area have been asking for a location in San Mateo,” Elton Kwok, general manager at WeWork, said in a statement to the Business Journal on Wednesday. “We’re thrilled to finally be able to service theMid-Peninsula area with our very first San Mateo location, and to meet the demand in this booming community.”

The news of the lease comes weeks after New York-based WeWork also announced it would open a second location in downtown San Jose, meant to meet overflowing demand from its existing downtown location at 75 E. Santa Clara St. Amazon.com’s secretive Lab126 division leases some of the co-working company’s 75,000 square feet in Santa Clara Street building, and entrepreneurs and small companies have maxed out the rest of the space in the building.

 

 

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Young couples and retirees ditch the city for a new kind of suburb

The term “surban” describes a suburban community that offers the conveniences of urban life.

John Burns Real Estate Consulting trademarked the word in 2016. Urban planners have long described a marriage of residential and commercial as “mixed-use” communities. This surban concept, while not novel, has been gaining popularity over the past few years.

Chris Porter, chief demographer at John Burns, said it’s a no-brainer option for many Americans, especially younger couples without kids and empty nesters. Surban communities are often near transit hubs and also have amenities like boutique fitness options, high-quality grocery stores and popular restaurants.

“It’s about lifestyle. There’s this idea that urban environments traditionally don’t have great public schools and the suburban environments do. That’s why you actually see a lot of families, once they start to have kids, moving to the suburbs for school quality. You’ve got lower crime in suburban areas than you would have in urban areas. In urban areas you have walkability and public transportation… bringing some of those things to the suburbs in small downtown areas is really the concept that we see — the concept of surban,” he said in a new podcast.

Projects like Irvine Spectrum, a mega outdoor shopping mall with a residential village adjacent to it, and San Jose’s Santana Row, which brands itself as a “small town feel inside the big city,” are cropping up across California.

City Place in Edgewater, New Jersey, which has luxury apartments sitting above stores like Anthropologie, is right next to a multiplex cinema. Developers are even investing in teacher’s villages that offer the best of both urban and suburban worlds.

Read more on Yahoo Finance

 

 

Facebook creates three huge Bay Area job hubs for expansion

Facebook has created three Bay Area work hubs that each total at least one million square feet, following big leases with two legendary developers that widen its Silicon Valley footprint.

The tech titan could employ as many as 19,000 in the expansion sites, located in Fremont, Sunnyvale, and Menlo Park.

The social networking giant is already expanding in its hometown of Menlo Park and has signed a mammoth lease in Sunnyvale. Now, it has signed major leases with Sobrato Organization and Peery Arrillaga totaling 18 buildings in a part of Fremont near the Dumbarton Bridge’s east end.

The most recent set of leases in Fremont total 1.04 million square feet, according to Facebook.

 

 

Read more on The Mercury News

 

 

 

Big downtown San Jose office, retail Museum Place complex pushes ahead

A new vision has emerged for a crucial downtown San Jose development known as Museum Place that would add offices and retail next to The Tech Museum of Innovation, according to city documents being reviewed this week.

Some details about the new Museum Place approach were contained in San Jose city staff reports regarding an agreement to bring aboard a group led by realty entrepreneur Gary Dillabough. The Dillabough group will provide fresh capital and investments to get the project moving forward. This news organization had reported previously about Dillabough’s planned involvement in the Museum Place development on Park Avenue.

“The developer has a formidable vision for San Jose’s future,” according to a memo prepared by Kim Walesh, San Jose’s economic development director. “Mr. Dillabough has indicated a strong desire to make the Museum Place project a standout location that the City of San Jose can look to with pride.”

 

 

Read more on The Mercury News

 

 

Cupertino’s ‘Apple employee tax’ put off for one year

Cupertino elected officials have scrapped a controversial plan — for now — to impose an employee tax on Apple and other businesses in the city, saying they don’t want to move forward in haste and will instead ask voters to weigh in during a special election in 2019.

Though the city council intended only to discuss the plan Tuesday night, after impassioned public comment during which several people spoke out against the proposal as either too vague or unfair to businesses, the council voted 3-1 to put off placing a measure on the November 2018 ballot. Vice Mayor Rod Sinks recused himself because his wife is an Apple employee.

Councilman Barry Chang dissented, saying that waiting even another year would prolong the city’s transportation problems. While the council had not yet come up with specific plans to use revenue generated by the so-called head tax, it had broadly earmarked transit and housing improvements.

“I think not only here, the big corporations in the entire nation, the corporations need to take up their fair share to help solve the problems we are facing now,” Chang said. “So that’s why this issue needs to be done and needs to be done now instead of waiting.”

Chang said he proposed a more ambitious plan two years ago — which would have charged businesses $1,000 per employee — but that that proposal was shot down by other council members.

“Two years ago, no council member supported it, so nothing happened,” he said. “Two years passed. If we don’t do anything this time now, another two years will pass, nothing will happen, I guarantee you.”

While Councilman Steven Scharf appeared to be in agreement with Chang about the urgency of addressing the region’s transportation problems, he explained, “We can’t do this justice in two weeks.”

The council would have had to agree by July 3 on the details of the proposed tax in order to get it on the November ballot. Instead, the council now plans to discuss on July 3 whether it should propose a general or special tax on businesses to put before voters in 2019.

 

 

Read more on The Mercury News

 

 

Cupertino to get serious tonight about new business tax that could generate millions from Apple

Cupertino’s City Council tonight will consider what kind of restructured business tax it might place on November’s ballot for Apple Inc.’s headquarters city.

The move comes as nearby Mountain View looks like it’s headed toward referendum to place a “head tax” on Alphabet’s Google and other large employers in its boundaries. Public polling in Cupertino has indicated heavy support for something similar there. Such a tax would mostly hit Apple, by far Cupertino’s largest employer.

Just a week ago, the City Council in Seattle — headquarters to Amazon.com — repealed a controversial head tax that it had put on the books just a few weeks earlier, after opposition from Amazon and others in the business community.

No such public threats have been made in Mountain View, but the Cupertino Chamber of Commerce posted a no jobs tax message on Twitter on Friday and sent out a press release quoting its president, Andrew Walters, calling for no such measure in November’s election.

The impetus for this budding movement in prosperous, tech-dominated cities is the belief that the traffic congestion and housing shortages in those places is due to tech growth, Cupertino Vice Mayor Rod Sinks recently told the Business Journal.

But although no one from Cupertino’s chamber would comment on the record, the organization’s opposition stems from the fact that the tax revenue the city hopes to gain is not restricted to specific projects that would address transportation issues that the chamber sees as most critical, the Business Journal was told.

Tonight’s meeting will be to decide what kind of tax — head tax (based on the number of a company’s employees), payroll tax or an expansion of Cupertino’s existing square-footage tax — might be proposed.

 

 

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Millennial migration favors San Jose despite cost of living, says census

The Bay Area is getting more mixed messages on the seemingly perennial question of if and how quickly residents are fleeing the region and the state.

The finance company Smart Asset released a report Friday claiming that San Jose is one of the most popular destinations for millennials on the move despite its high cost of living.

Smart Asset economist Derek Miller sorted through U.S. Census data to figure out which U.S. cities got the greatest inflow—i.e., the margin of new residents relocating to a city over the number of those moving away—with the ever-topical millennial demographic, here defined as anyone between the ages of 20 and 34 in 2016.

Suffice to say, San Francisco did not acquit itself well with the trend, despite previous census analyses revealing that the city’s median age is gradually getting younger with each passing year. Instead, millennial movers reportedly favored San Jose, which came in seventh place on Miller’s list, the only California city to break the top ten.

 

 

Read more on Curbed SF

 

 

Big north San Jose live-work development of offices, shops, homes is proposed

A big mixed-use development is being eyed in north San Jose, an ambitious project that developers tout as a live-work complex of offices, homes and retail which could help ease the region’s traffic woes.

Sand Hill Property, the developer and owner of the project site, has requested a preliminary review of a proposal for 505,000 square feet of offices, 800 residential units and 13,000 square feet of retail on 9.3 acres at the southwest corner of North First Street and Orchard Parkway in San Jose.

“We are looking at a jobs-housing balance with this project,” said Steve Lynch, director of planning and entitlement with Palo Alto-based Sand Hill Property. “This is a significant site right on the light rail line.”

The proposal is in the very preliminary stages and is being floated as a way for Sand Hill and San Jose city officials to consider what sort of project would work at that location. The early stage review is occurring amid a wide-ranging effort by San Jose to establish guidelines for future development in the area.

North First Street is a heavily traveled route with a light rail line and a diverse array of tech companies.

“What Sand Hill is talking about is a mix of offices and residential, with some retail along North First Street,” said Patrick Kelly, a supervising planner with the city of San Jose. “It would be a transit employment center.”

Although considerable review of the proposal is still needed even in this preliminary stage, it’s possible this type of development conforms with the sorts of projects San Jose officials envision in the area, Kelly said.

 

 

Read more on The Mercury News

 

 

San Jose becomes a ‘city of churn’ as high-earners move in and residents look to lower-cost markets

San Jose is simultaneously one of the nation’s most sought cities by job seekers and home to the most job holders who want to leave, a dichotomy that could have profound impacts on Silicon Valley’s business future and social fabric.

That dichotomy stems from the way technology has become the foundation of the U.S. economy and Silicon Valley the capital of that industry, says the author of a recently published study by the online jobs and recruiting site Glassdoor. And it could have profound impacts on the Valley’s business future and social fabric.

“San Jose is a city of churn,” said Andrew Chamberlain, Glassdoor’s chief economist. “It’s the most dynamic of any city of the big metros we looked at” in the company’s 25-page report entitled “Metro Movers: Where are Americans moving for jobs and is it worth it?”

San Jose ranks third on the list of places — after San Francisco and New York — where U.S. job seekers in Glassdoor’s database of 668,000 job applications are applying, the report says.

But San Jose ranks behind only Providence, Rhode Island — which turns out talented college graduates much faster than it creates jobs — as home to the largest percentage (47.6 percent) of applicants seeking work elsewhere.

 

 

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Google unveils broad vision for San Jose’s Diridon Station as some community members rally to halt the plans

 

Google announced nearly a year ago that it had visions of a mixed-use campus spanning up to 8 millions square feet in San Jose’s Diridon Station.

Since then, the tech giant has invested heavily in real estate in the area. Google has begun to lay out a high-level vision for San Jose’s Diridon Station area, a 240-acre swath of land around the city’s primary transit hub where the company has dreams of building a massive mixed-use campus.

But barely as Joe Van Belleghem, senior director of development for Google cleared his throat to start a presentation that would outline a framework for long corridors filled with retail, homes, art and a cluster of office buildings, more than a dozen city residents marched in, banner and signs in hand.

“OK now Google, we know you’re bad,” the protesters yelled. “Don’t need you here, we’ve got our own, turn around and go home!”

 

 

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