Big downtown San Jose housing towers, retail, restaurant complex pushes ahead

A big development that will bring downtown San Jose two striking residential towers containing more than 600 dwellings, along with spaces for a restaurant, coffee shop and retailers, is slated to push ahead with construction this month, according to a realty executive.

Miro is a housing high-rise that would dramatically reshape San Jose’s skyline and become its tallest towers.

The project has gotten through a three-month delay after workers hit an aquifer and water poured into the construction site, creating a large pond that had to be controlled and pumped out.

Now that project developer Bayview Development Group has vanquished the water woes, contractors are expected to begin pouring the surface concrete slab within the next few weeks, a necessary prelude to construction of the vertical components.

 

The development would include two towers that each will rise 28 stories and will also offer 18,000 square feet of commercial space, including enough room for a sit-down restaurant, a coffee shop and other retailers.

 

The project fronts on East Santa Clara Street as well as the corners of North Fourth and North Fifth streets. It’s right across the street from San Jose City Hall.

 

 

Read more on East Bay Times

 

 

The shopping mall’s savior is starting to eat itself

Restaurants, one of the supposed saviors of regional malls, have been hurt in the past 12 months by too much expansion and a slowdown in consumer spending.

Stephen Wall’s restaurant chain Pho is the kind of tenant that mall landlords would love to attract. The Vietnamese menu is right on trend, the business is expanding and, even better, it has a track record of success in shopping centers.

Yet he thinks that even restaurants like his won’t be the savior of malls suffering from the rise of internet retailing and mobile phone addiction.

As competition from the likes of Amazon.com Inc. and Asos Plc intensified, British mall owners looked to food as a way to stay relevant. People would come to the restaurants to eat, buy some clothes in the shops while there, and the extra spending would allow the landlord to boost the rents. A simple, virtuous circle.

Instead, food and beverage operators have been hurt over the past 12 months by a combination of rapid expansion and a consumer-spending slowdown. An influx of private-equity investment into restaurants led some chains to open too many outlets that aren’t breaking even. Popular names like Gourmet Burger Kitchen, pasta place Carluccio’s and the Jamie Oliver chain — often found at big malls like Westfield and Bluewater around London or Manchester’s Trafford Centre — have been among those suffering. Nationwide, the number of restaurants going insolvent rose 24 percent last year, compared with 2017.

 

 

Read more on National Real Estate Investor

 

 

 

How low-cost chains are changing the retail game

Dollar store chains are among America’s fastest-growing retailers, but their impact on the industry is coming under increased scrutiny.

Nonprofit Institute for Local Self-Reliance reports that dollar stores are more prevalent than Walmart and McDonalds locations combined, and they feed more people than Whole Foods stores. In some urban neighborhoods, low-income and rural areas, dollar stores might be one of the only retail options for residents.

The number of dollar stores in America has grown from 20,000 in 2011 to almost 30,000, per ILSR. With many Americans living paycheck to paycheck, it’s not surprising these small-box stores selling affordable merchandise are thriving.

The ILSR report contends that dollar stores — which lack fresh produce and meat but offer a host of frozen, processed and canned food options — aren’t a symptom of economic distress in some communities, but the cause of it, as they stifle independent grocers and other local retailers.

“To the extent that dollar stores are filling, in some ways, a need in communities, I think that is true in the short term,” Marie Donahue, one of the report’s authors, told Civil Eats. “But really our research is demonstrating…those foods aren’t as good quality as full-service grocers or independent local stores, which may be able to connect to local farmers and the larger food system.”

 

 

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

 

 

New SF hotels, WeWork-backed waterfront school among ideas for historic piers

Developer Simon Snellgrove has an idea: A new 65-room boutique hotel just south of the Ferry Building.

The problem: Hotels are illegal on Port of San Francisco land unless voters authorize them.

Snellgrove’s concept is one of 52 responses received by the port to revitalize 13 historic waterfront piers that dot the city’s scenic Embarcadero.

For the past three years, the port has sought public uses to bring new life for the piers, some of which were built over a century ago. The projects have big financial hurdles, requiring millions of dollars in renovations to withstand future earthquakes and sea level rise. But previous projects like the renovated Ferry Building and AT&T Park are a testament to the public’s love — and the lucrative business — of waterfront development.

The port received a diverse mix of ideas, including basketball and tennis courts, art galleries, an Italian Innovation Hub, and an International House of Prayer of Children. Boston Properties, the city’s biggest office owner and majority owner of Salesforce Tower, said it was open to operating nonprofit, maker and research space.

 

 

Read more on SFGate

 

 

 

 

Are food halls a magic elixir for retail owners?

The concept of the food hall has taken deep root in U.S. retail properties, with scores up and running and hundreds in the pipeline.

Though a popular addition for struggling retail properties, celebrity chef Todd English said that without the right approach, food halls are not always the solution for owners. English spoke at the recent Second Annual International Council of Shopping Centers-Baruch College Real Estate Conference, as reported by Real Estate Weekly.

He warned that some food halls are merely “glorified food courts with better options.” He further called food halls a WeWork model, a kind of coworking space that “has to be about more than just food.”

Food halls are a draw because of their perceived authenticity, as local eateries, healthier options and craft breweries edge out standard food court fare (fast food, that is).

While not every food hall is going to feature chef-curated or otherwise expensive options, they have to be creative in some way, English said during the ICSC conference. “It’s not just another great turkey sandwich or croissant, or whatever the latest trend is, it’s something that brings people in.”

For retailers, a successful food hall is thus not a matter of simply setting up a food hall. With the increasing number of food halls, they too need to stand out to be competitive.

 

 

Read more on Bisnow

 

NAI Northern California Represents $11.4M Sale of Eureka Safeway

Eureka, Calif – NAI Northern California, the Bay Area presence for NAI Global, the largest commercial real estate brokerage network in the world, is proud to announce the $11.4 million sale of the Eureka Safeway grocery store.

Executive Vice President Doug Sharpe represented the buyer who purchased the property for less than the asking price.

“Opportunities such as these come infrequently: great location, great building, great team. This asset fit perfectly with the unique circumstances presented by the buyer,” said Sharpe of NAI Northern California.

The acquisition of the 49,145 SF Safeway offers the buyer a rare retail opportunity in Eureka as the only national grocery store in town, making it the go-to market. Situated at the northeast corner Harris Street and Harrison Ave., nearly 60,000 drivers pass the store daily.

Because of Sharpe’s professional commitment to relationship building, he was able to bring the buyer and the seller together to reach a mutually beneficial deal. Speaking about the way this deal came together, Sharpe quoted Zig Ziglar, the well-known motivational speaker, teacher and trainer, “‘If people like you, they’ll listen to you; but if they trust you, they’ll do business with you.’”

The Safeway terms include a brand new 20-year absolute NNN lease with fixed rent increases, providing the buyer with an excellent long-term investment that hedges against future market inflation with no landlord responsibilities.

 

About NAI Northern California

NAI Northern California is a full-service commercial real estate firm serving the Northern California Bay Area. Our team delivers technology-enabled commercial real estate services that create value for our clients, industry, and communities.

NAI Northern California is a partner of NAI Global, the largest commercial real estate brokerage network with more than 400 offices worldwide and over 7,000 professionals completing in excess of $20 billion in commercial real estate transactions globally.

To learn more, visit nainorcal.com.

NAI Northern California Represents $20.5M Sale of Developable Land in Downtown Redwood City

NAI Northern California, the Bay Area presence for NAI Global, the largest commercial real estate brokerage network in the world, is proud to announce the $20.5 million sale of 1180-90 Main Street in Redwood City.

Senior Investment Advisor Kevin Flaherty and Investment Advisor Derrick Reedy represented the seller, Lathrop PARC, LLC, on a lengthy and complicated escrow.

“This is the last piece of undeveloped land of any significance in downtown Redwood City and Premia Capital has a beautiful project they are planning to build. Premia was great to work with and they have a great team leading the charge for entitlements of the 110,000 sq. ft. office building, coming soon,” said Flaherty of NAI Northern California.

The 58,000 sq. ft. parcel of developable office property, in downtown Redwood City, has a 2.0 FAR for the office.

1180 Main Street is located at a key gateway bordering downtown and the El Camino Real corridor, and sits adjacent to the Caltrain corridor. The purposed office building will be designed and located with the intention to revitalize an existing culvert and to create a public park that will be an asset to both the occupants of the building as well as the general public. The outdoor space will be shared with the neighboring residential units.

Flaherty said, “This project will continue the expansion of Redwood City’s downtown office, retail and multi-family world-class real estate. We expect the leasing rate of the new building to rival all major metropolitan areas worldwide.”

About NAI Northern California

NAI Northern California is a full-service commercial real estate firm serving the Northern California Bay Area. Our team delivers technology-enabled commercial real estate services that create value for our clients, industry, and communities.

NAI Northern California is a partner of NAI Global, the largest commercial real estate brokerage network with more than 400 offices worldwide and over 7,000 professionals completing in excess of $20 billion in commercial real estate transactions globally.

Crane Watch update: More than 22,000 residential units have flooded into San Jose’s development pipeline

More than 22,000 new residential units have been proposed in the city of San Jose — the largest city in the housing-starved Bay Area — according to city records and Business Journal reporting over the past year.

Those number have been gathered over the past year and a half and detailed in the Silicon Valley Business Journal’s Crane Watch map, which is a compilation of every large development project that has arrived at the San Jose city hall.

When the Silicon Valley Business Journal’s Crane Watch map launched in 2017, it detailed 30 of the biggest projects in San Jose. But a little more than a year later, the number of projects we’re tracking has ballooned to 107 proposals. These include developments that are anywhere in the city’s development pipeline, from an early vision submitted to the city for feedback all the way to a recently completed structure.

Crane Watch shows industrial, office, residential, hotel, health care, education, retail and mixed-use proposals, and active projects that are 90,000 square feet in size or larger throughout the city of San Jose.

Read more on Silicon Valley Business Journal

 

 

 

How will S.F.’s tallest buildings fare in the next big earthquake? Report expresses concerns

San Francisco’s tall buildings may be at risk of damage during the next big earthquake, a study released by research nonprofit Applied Technology Council (ATC) last week warns.

The 36-page report outlines vulnerability concerns over outdated building standards and provides a strategy for proactive safety checks.

The study’s release comes just days after cracks were found in two steel beams of San Francisco’s newly minted $2.2 billion Transbay Transit Center, and as Millennium Tower next door continues to sink and tilt. Last year, the late Mayor Ed Lee commissioned the report, which was prepared by a group of engineers.

The report probed the city’s 156 tallest buildings — either constructed or permitted for construction — that are at least 240 feet high, primarily located in San Francisco’s Financial District. About 60 percent of these buildings house business and office space, while the rest are zoned residential.

 

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

 

 

The 10 top emerging trends that will shape real estate in 2019

The Urban Land Institute’s annual look at the year ahead focuses on technology and transformation at an uncertain moment.

It’s complicated. In the course of compiling its annual Emerging Trends report, the Urban Land Institute found that the only certainty in its outlook for 2019 was uncertainty. Expert analysis points to a more complex, multi-layered series of overlapping trends, with unpredictable results, as opposed to a few strong narratives.

Will technology offer more opportunity and enhance competition and efficiency, or help consolidate the industry and drive out smaller players? How will shifts in demographics and shopping patterns challenge current investment practices? Will the U.S. ever get a grip on its housing affordability issues?

The report, a joint project of ULI and PricewaterhouseCoopers researchers unveiled during its fall meeting in Boston this afternoon, considered the responses of more than 750 real estate professionals in creating an high-level overview of the trends it believes will impact the real estate world. While the report expects an overall economic slowdown next year, emerging trends and markets in flux that could provide new opportunities.

 

 

Read more on Curbed