Oakland requires landlords to retrofit ‘soft-story’ buildings

Landlords have six years to retrofit the buildings, which are prone to substantial earthquake damage.

To prevent hundreds of multi-story, wood-frame apartment buildings from collapsing as they did in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, Oakland is requiring seismic upgrades of all those at risk in the next big shaker.

There are 1,479 such “soft-story” apartment buildings in the city constructed before 1991 — when the building code changed — that stand two to seven stories tall and contain five or more apartments, according to a 2008 analysis by the city and the Association of Bay Area Governments.Those buildings are supported by slim columns with either garages or storefronts underneath, and contain a total of 24,273 apartments.

With fears of the “big one” occurring any day now along the Hayward fault — which runs along northeast Oakland and south along Interstate 580 — the City Council unanimously passed an ordinance Dec. 14 making the seismic retrofitting of soft-story buildings with more than five units mandatory, giving landlords four to six years to get their buildings up to code.

“A major earthquake along the Hayward fault is not a matter of if, it is a matter of when,” Mayor Libby Schaaf said in a statement released a week before the meeting. “As a city, we have a responsibility to put measures in place that will prevent injury and loss of life, and reduce displacement and recovery time in the aftermath of a major quake. This ordinance does all of those while also ensuring that we’re not placing an undue financial burden on property owners and tenants in our community.”

San Francisco passed a similar ordinance that went into effect in 2017; Berkeley and Fremont also require soft-story buildings to be seismically retrofitted. The Hayward council is scheduled to consider a similar measure in February.

In 2009, Oakland required soft-story building owners to gauge the potential earthquake damage that could occur. In the city’s 2015-2023 General Plan, officials called for the creation of a seismic safety retrofit program that would encourage retrofits through financial and procedural incentives.

Councilmember Dan Kalb — who introduced the ordinance — said city staff had been researching the risks of soft-story buildings and working toward the legislation for about four years. Though some California cities have required the buildings be retrofitted, others have not yet addressed the issue.

Seismic retrofits fall under the Oakland rent board’s definition of capital improvements, and thus up to 70 percent of the cost of may be passed on to the tenants. This ordinance requires that pass-through costs to tenants be dispersed over 25 years to prevent substantial rent hikes.

 

Read more on East Bay Times

 

 

As another San Francisco office tenant decamps for Oakland, will Salesforce take its space?

Another office tenant plans to move to Oakland from San Francisco, freeing up some space that Salesforce is reportedly looking to lease.

The exodus of office tenants fleeing San Francisco for Oakland continues. The latest example is the California State Department of Insurance, which plants to vacate its space in 45 Fremont St. and recently signed a lease for 47,000 square feet on three floors in 1901 Harrison St. in Oakland.

Another tenant, Blue Shield of California, inked a deal back in 2016 to leave the same building for space in a new office tower, 601 City Center in Oakland. The insurance company plans to occupy 225,000 square feet in the building in mid-2019.

The moves illustrate a broader trend of traditional office tenants leaving San Francisco while the tech industry gobbles up available spaces.

Cloud software maker Salesforce Inc. is rumored to be close to taking the 282,000 square feet in 45 Fremont, owned by Shorenstein Properties and Blackstone Group. The building is next door to 350 Mission St., known as Salesforce East, that is part of Salesforce’s urban campus in SoMa.

 

 

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

 

 

There’s a new plan to stop Millennium Tower sinking — and settle lawsuits

All sides in the Millennium Tower debacle appear to be nearing an agreement on a $100 million-plus fix to stop the 58-story high-rise from sinking further — but at least part of the building’s tilt will probably remain.

“We’re very encouraged by the recent progress that has been made,” said P.J. Johnston, spokesman for Millennium Partners, the luxury condominium’s developer. “We look forward to working with the homeowners and the city to get this all completed as soon as possible.”

Doug Elmets, spokesman for the homeowners association, cautioned that nothing has been submitted to the city yet for review, but that residents are “encouraged by the ongoing progress.”

The latest plan calls for drilling piles into bedrock from the sidewalk on the building’s southwest corner. The proposal would be less extensive and intrusive than the plan floated in April, which called for drilling as many as 300 micro-piles to bedrock through the building’s concrete foundation.

The idea was to stabilize one side of the 58-story structure, then let the other side continue to sink until the building straightened itself. That plan, however, probably would have cost upward of $350 million — as much as it cost to build the tower in the first place.

The new plan by Ronald Hamburger, the structural engineer for the developer, is expected to be considerably less expensive and faster, and without as significant a disruption to the residents.

“Hopefully, it will take out some of the tilt and stop the building from moving entirely,” said one source familiar with the plan, but who wasn’t authorized to speak for the record.

The tower has sunk 18 inches and tilted 14 inches to the west since it opened in April 2009.

The building sits on a 10-foot-thick mat foundation, held in place by 950 reinforced concrete piles sunk 60 to 90 feet deep into clay and mud. They do not, however, reach bedrock.

The repair job is expected to take several months to complete. The timeline for getting started, however, will probably hinge on how fast the parties can get approval of an environmental impact report and the necessary building permits.

Read more on The San Francisco Chronicle

Are food halls a magic elixir for retail owners?

The concept of the food hall has taken deep root in U.S. retail properties, with scores up and running and hundreds in the pipeline.

Though a popular addition for struggling retail properties, celebrity chef Todd English said that without the right approach, food halls are not always the solution for owners. English spoke at the recent Second Annual International Council of Shopping Centers-Baruch College Real Estate Conference, as reported by Real Estate Weekly.

He warned that some food halls are merely “glorified food courts with better options.” He further called food halls a WeWork model, a kind of coworking space that “has to be about more than just food.”

Food halls are a draw because of their perceived authenticity, as local eateries, healthier options and craft breweries edge out standard food court fare (fast food, that is).

While not every food hall is going to feature chef-curated or otherwise expensive options, they have to be creative in some way, English said during the ICSC conference. “It’s not just another great turkey sandwich or croissant, or whatever the latest trend is, it’s something that brings people in.”

For retailers, a successful food hall is thus not a matter of simply setting up a food hall. With the increasing number of food halls, they too need to stand out to be competitive.

 

 

Read more on Bisnow

 

NAI Northern California Represents $11.4M Sale of Eureka Safeway

Eureka, Calif – NAI Northern California, the Bay Area presence for NAI Global, the largest commercial real estate brokerage network in the world, is proud to announce the $11.4 million sale of the Eureka Safeway grocery store.

Executive Vice President Doug Sharpe represented the buyer who purchased the property for less than the asking price.

“Opportunities such as these come infrequently: great location, great building, great team. This asset fit perfectly with the unique circumstances presented by the buyer,” said Sharpe of NAI Northern California.

The acquisition of the 49,145 SF Safeway offers the buyer a rare retail opportunity in Eureka as the only national grocery store in town, making it the go-to market. Situated at the northeast corner Harris Street and Harrison Ave., nearly 60,000 drivers pass the store daily.

Because of Sharpe’s professional commitment to relationship building, he was able to bring the buyer and the seller together to reach a mutually beneficial deal. Speaking about the way this deal came together, Sharpe quoted Zig Ziglar, the well-known motivational speaker, teacher and trainer, “‘If people like you, they’ll listen to you; but if they trust you, they’ll do business with you.’”

The Safeway terms include a brand new 20-year absolute NNN lease with fixed rent increases, providing the buyer with an excellent long-term investment that hedges against future market inflation with no landlord responsibilities.

 

About NAI Northern California

NAI Northern California is a full-service commercial real estate firm serving the Northern California Bay Area. Our team delivers technology-enabled commercial real estate services that create value for our clients, industry, and communities.

NAI Northern California is a partner of NAI Global, the largest commercial real estate brokerage network with more than 400 offices worldwide and over 7,000 professionals completing in excess of $20 billion in commercial real estate transactions globally.

To learn more, visit nainorcal.com.

NAI Northern California Represents $20.5M Sale of Developable Land in Downtown Redwood City

NAI Northern California, the Bay Area presence for NAI Global, the largest commercial real estate brokerage network in the world, is proud to announce the $20.5 million sale of 1180-90 Main Street in Redwood City.

Senior Investment Advisor Kevin Flaherty and Investment Advisor Derrick Reedy represented the seller, Lathrop PARC, LLC, on a lengthy and complicated escrow.

“This is the last piece of undeveloped land of any significance in downtown Redwood City and Premia Capital has a beautiful project they are planning to build. Premia was great to work with and they have a great team leading the charge for entitlements of the 110,000 sq. ft. office building, coming soon,” said Flaherty of NAI Northern California.

The 58,000 sq. ft. parcel of developable office property, in downtown Redwood City, has a 2.0 FAR for the office.

1180 Main Street is located at a key gateway bordering downtown and the El Camino Real corridor, and sits adjacent to the Caltrain corridor. The purposed office building will be designed and located with the intention to revitalize an existing culvert and to create a public park that will be an asset to both the occupants of the building as well as the general public. The outdoor space will be shared with the neighboring residential units.

Flaherty said, “This project will continue the expansion of Redwood City’s downtown office, retail and multi-family world-class real estate. We expect the leasing rate of the new building to rival all major metropolitan areas worldwide.”

About NAI Northern California

NAI Northern California is a full-service commercial real estate firm serving the Northern California Bay Area. Our team delivers technology-enabled commercial real estate services that create value for our clients, industry, and communities.

NAI Northern California is a partner of NAI Global, the largest commercial real estate brokerage network with more than 400 offices worldwide and over 7,000 professionals completing in excess of $20 billion in commercial real estate transactions globally.

The 10 top emerging trends that will shape real estate in 2019

The Urban Land Institute’s annual look at the year ahead focuses on technology and transformation at an uncertain moment.

It’s complicated. In the course of compiling its annual Emerging Trends report, the Urban Land Institute found that the only certainty in its outlook for 2019 was uncertainty. Expert analysis points to a more complex, multi-layered series of overlapping trends, with unpredictable results, as opposed to a few strong narratives.

Will technology offer more opportunity and enhance competition and efficiency, or help consolidate the industry and drive out smaller players? How will shifts in demographics and shopping patterns challenge current investment practices? Will the U.S. ever get a grip on its housing affordability issues?

The report, a joint project of ULI and PricewaterhouseCoopers researchers unveiled during its fall meeting in Boston this afternoon, considered the responses of more than 750 real estate professionals in creating an high-level overview of the trends it believes will impact the real estate world. While the report expects an overall economic slowdown next year, emerging trends and markets in flux that could provide new opportunities.

 

 

Read more on Curbed

 

 

 

Exclusive: East Bay’s NewPark Mall pushes plan for 1,500 homes next to stores

As malls across the country struggle to stay afloat in the face of stiff competition from online retailers, NewPark Mall in Newark is pushing ahead on a $1 billion redevelopment project.

Brookfield Retail Properties, which took over NewPark when it acquired the mall’s previous owner, Rouse Properties, in 2016, wants to redevelop the mall and surrounding land into a vibrant community of apartments, parks, hotels, office space and event centers.

“We want to see the mall repositioned to take it to the next level,” said Terrence Grindall, Newark’s assistant city manager.

 

 

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

 

 

Sinking Millennium Tower’s window cracks, SF seeks answers about safety

The sinking Millennium Tower in San Francisco has another problem.

A cracked window on the 36th floor that’s prompted San Francisco officials to issue a citation requiring building engineers to report on the condition of the glass panel.

The window cracked early Sunday morning.

“At this time, we do not know what caused this fracture, though it appears to be limited to this one specific unit,” Bill Strawn, spokesman for the San Francisco Department of Building Inspection, said in a statement.

The 58-story residential tower has sunk more than 17 inches since it opened in 2009.

 

 

Full article on SFGate

 

 

 

 

UC Berkeley professor blames rent control for California’s housing shortage

Kenneth Rosen hopes to sway voters against Proposition 10.

Kenneth Rosen, a UC Berkeley economist and real estate consultant, published a paper Wednesday titled The Case For Preserving Costa Hawkins, in hopes of swaying voters against Proposition 10.

Proposition 10, which will go before voters in November, would repeal the 1995 Costa-Hawkins Act, a state law that severely curtails rent control in California cities. For example, under Costa-Hawkins, only San Francisco apartments built before 1979 may be subject to rent control.

Passing Proposition 10 would not in and of itself create any new rent control housing, but it would allow cities to expand rent control stock for the first time in decades if they so choose.

Rosen, however, argues that turning the clock back to 1994 will stifle new housing and drain apartment stock.

 

Read more on Curbed SF