Downtown San Jose, Oakland opportunity zones attract investors, spur development plans amid Google effect

Developers eye projects in downtown San Jose and parts of Oakland, bolstered by tax incentives keyed to opportunity zone.

Developers and a new crop of investors are eyeing projects in downtown San Jose and parts of Oakland, bolstered by opportunity zones enabled by President Donald Trump’s tax-cut initiative.

Potentially the first project in a local opportunity zone would be development of a brand-new office and retail complex on South First Street in downtown San Jose at the site of the old Lido night club, said Erik Hayden, president of Urban Catalyst, a company that as formed an opportunity fund that would provide cash for selected developments in designated areas.

“These opportunity zones are ways to create greater economic activity in lower-income areas,” Hayden said. “They were originally presented to the Obama Administration but didn’t get a lot of traction. Then they became part of President Trump’s tax cuts and jobs act. San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo very successfully lobbied Gov. Jerry Brown to get downtown San Jose included.”

Investors who plunk down cash for an opportunity fund can “defer or eliminate federal taxes on capital gains,” according to information on the state’s Department of Finance site.

The Lido night club site, currently a two-story building at 26 and 30 S. First St., is now owned by a partnership led by Gary Dillabough, who has emerged as one of downtown San Jose’s most active realty investors and developers. Among the properties Dillabough-headed groups have bought: the nearby Bank of Italy building, a historic office tower at the corner of South First and East Santa Clara streets.

 

 

 

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New hotel proposal beefs up Mid-Market’s development pipeline

The new proposal will join a party of other sites looking to take advantage of the area’s powerful corporate presence.

Another hotel team has thrown their hat into Mid-Market’s development ring with a plan to cater to the neighborhood’s rising corporate and extended-stay demand.

San Francisco-based Stanton Architecture has submitted a preliminary project assessment application for a $40 million, 16-story limited-service hotel slated to deliver 162 rooms to the corner of Mission and Ninth Streets. The proposal would include the demolition of two existing buildings: a vacant commercial property at 1310 Mission St. and a mixed residential-tourist hotel at 80 Ninth St.

With Twitter, Uber, Dolby Laboratories, and Square headquarters just a block or two away, principal Michael Stanton said the project’s location and oversized rooms are a perfect fit.

“With several corporations headquartered there, it’s seen as a business hotel in the week and a family and visitor hotel on the weekend,” he said. “It will be a terrific plus for the area.”

 

Read more at San Francisco Business Times

 

 

Apartment rents expected to rise faster than inflation in 2019

Rents are likely to rise the most for class-B apartments, and the least for class-C and -D units.
Rents are likely to rise faster for older, class-B apartments in 2019 than for any other class of apartment property.“We expect Class-B to continue to have the strongest average rent growth, as it has through recent history,” says Andrew Rybczynski, senior consultant at research firm the CoStar Group.

“While occupancy is sky high in class-C product, rent growth in that sector is beginning to slow a little,” says Ron Willett, chief economist for MPF Research, a RealPage company.

 

 

 

Read more at National Real Estate Investor

 

 

 

 

Big downtown San Jose housing towers, retail, restaurant complex pushes ahead

A big development that will bring downtown San Jose two striking residential towers containing more than 600 dwellings, along with spaces for a restaurant, coffee shop and retailers, is slated to push ahead with construction this month, according to a realty executive.

Miro is a housing high-rise that would dramatically reshape San Jose’s skyline and become its tallest towers.

The project has gotten through a three-month delay after workers hit an aquifer and water poured into the construction site, creating a large pond that had to be controlled and pumped out.

Now that project developer Bayview Development Group has vanquished the water woes, contractors are expected to begin pouring the surface concrete slab within the next few weeks, a necessary prelude to construction of the vertical components.

 

The development would include two towers that each will rise 28 stories and will also offer 18,000 square feet of commercial space, including enough room for a sit-down restaurant, a coffee shop and other retailers.

 

The project fronts on East Santa Clara Street as well as the corners of North Fourth and North Fifth streets. It’s right across the street from San Jose City Hall.

 

 

Read more on East Bay Times

 

 

New Richmond ferry draws developers and businesses to long-struggling city

A new ferry terminal has spurred development and optimism in Richmond.

Keba Konte hopes a new ferry in Richmond will bring his business scores of new customers.

Konte’s Red Bay Coffee, which currently operates three locations in Oakland, will cater to Richmond’s first ferry commuters in over two decades when the city opens its new $21 million ferry terminal on Jan. 10. He plans to park his coffee truck near the waterfront Craneway Pavilion.

“Richmond interests us because it shares the same spirit as the city of Oakland, a working-class city that has often been viewed as the underdog. It’s a developing city and we strive to be a part of that story,” Konte said.

The ferry terminal has spurred other businesses and developers to want to be a part of Richmond’s story as well. They’re attracted to the idea of a high-density waterfront community, a 35-minute commute to San Francisco and increased foot traffic to businesses and restaurants along the waterfront and downtown. Already, there are over 2,000 housing units slated to be built within five miles of the terminal, said Richmond Mayor Tom Butt.

“The waterfront is our biggest opportunity to promote Richmond,” Butt said. “The ferry service is going to accelerate some of these projects in the pipeline because a l lot of people are really anticipating that ferry. A lot of people commute to San Francisco from Richmond and areas around it. It’s going to be popular.

 

 

 

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

 

The shopping mall’s savior is starting to eat itself

Restaurants, one of the supposed saviors of regional malls, have been hurt in the past 12 months by too much expansion and a slowdown in consumer spending.

Stephen Wall’s restaurant chain Pho is the kind of tenant that mall landlords would love to attract. The Vietnamese menu is right on trend, the business is expanding and, even better, it has a track record of success in shopping centers.

Yet he thinks that even restaurants like his won’t be the savior of malls suffering from the rise of internet retailing and mobile phone addiction.

As competition from the likes of Amazon.com Inc. and Asos Plc intensified, British mall owners looked to food as a way to stay relevant. People would come to the restaurants to eat, buy some clothes in the shops while there, and the extra spending would allow the landlord to boost the rents. A simple, virtuous circle.

Instead, food and beverage operators have been hurt over the past 12 months by a combination of rapid expansion and a consumer-spending slowdown. An influx of private-equity investment into restaurants led some chains to open too many outlets that aren’t breaking even. Popular names like Gourmet Burger Kitchen, pasta place Carluccio’s and the Jamie Oliver chain — often found at big malls like Westfield and Bluewater around London or Manchester’s Trafford Centre — have been among those suffering. Nationwide, the number of restaurants going insolvent rose 24 percent last year, compared with 2017.

 

 

Read more on National Real Estate Investor

 

 

 

Oakland requires landlords to retrofit ‘soft-story’ buildings

Landlords have six years to retrofit the buildings, which are prone to substantial earthquake damage.

To prevent hundreds of multi-story, wood-frame apartment buildings from collapsing as they did in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, Oakland is requiring seismic upgrades of all those at risk in the next big shaker.

There are 1,479 such “soft-story” apartment buildings in the city constructed before 1991 — when the building code changed — that stand two to seven stories tall and contain five or more apartments, according to a 2008 analysis by the city and the Association of Bay Area Governments.Those buildings are supported by slim columns with either garages or storefronts underneath, and contain a total of 24,273 apartments.

With fears of the “big one” occurring any day now along the Hayward fault — which runs along northeast Oakland and south along Interstate 580 — the City Council unanimously passed an ordinance Dec. 14 making the seismic retrofitting of soft-story buildings with more than five units mandatory, giving landlords four to six years to get their buildings up to code.

“A major earthquake along the Hayward fault is not a matter of if, it is a matter of when,” Mayor Libby Schaaf said in a statement released a week before the meeting. “As a city, we have a responsibility to put measures in place that will prevent injury and loss of life, and reduce displacement and recovery time in the aftermath of a major quake. This ordinance does all of those while also ensuring that we’re not placing an undue financial burden on property owners and tenants in our community.”

San Francisco passed a similar ordinance that went into effect in 2017; Berkeley and Fremont also require soft-story buildings to be seismically retrofitted. The Hayward council is scheduled to consider a similar measure in February.

In 2009, Oakland required soft-story building owners to gauge the potential earthquake damage that could occur. In the city’s 2015-2023 General Plan, officials called for the creation of a seismic safety retrofit program that would encourage retrofits through financial and procedural incentives.

Councilmember Dan Kalb — who introduced the ordinance — said city staff had been researching the risks of soft-story buildings and working toward the legislation for about four years. Though some California cities have required the buildings be retrofitted, others have not yet addressed the issue.

Seismic retrofits fall under the Oakland rent board’s definition of capital improvements, and thus up to 70 percent of the cost of may be passed on to the tenants. This ordinance requires that pass-through costs to tenants be dispersed over 25 years to prevent substantial rent hikes.

 

Read more on East Bay Times

 

 

San Francisco readies for convention boom as $500 million Moscone Center expansion opens

Nearly two years after it closed for a $550 million renovation, San Francisco’s larger Moscone Center reemerges on Jan. 4, aiming to take the city’s convention business into a new era.

Expanded by 350,000 square feet, Moscone’s north and south wings are now fully connected, creating up to 500,000 square feet of flexible and contiguous convention space and allowing San Francisco to host simultaneous conventions.

For the city’s hospitality industry, which bore the brunt of Moscone’s closure, its return has been a long time coming.

Hotel room bookings, which fell by more than half a million while Moscone was closed, are now set to rebound to an all-time high in 2019. Restaurants and other businesses that feed off the convention trade are eager to eat their fill again. Moscone is expected to attract 175,000 net new visitors annually who will spend a projected $180 million a year and, for the city, generate an additional $20 million in hotel tax.

 

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

 

Square takes over enormous Oakland building

Uptown Station, once meant to be Uber’s Oakland HQ, nets a new tech tenant.

Not too long ago, the circa 1929 Beaux-Arts building in Oakland now known as Uptown Station was meant to be the East Bay home of Uber, which had ambitious plans for the historic and recently refurbished locale.

But Uber sold the building almost exactly a year ago, netting $175 million from Oakland-based investment firm CIM Group but leaving the future of the sometimes neglected unofficial landmark up in the air.

On Thursday, CIM and Square announced that the SF-based payment app company owned by Twitter CEO (and Benioff antagonist) Jack Dorsey will lease much of the building, completing the locale’s long transition into an East Bay tech hub.

“Square has signed a lease for the entire office space in the iconic Uptown Station building,” according to a Thursday press release from both companies, a deal covering more than 350,000 square feet.

The building at 1955 Broadway first opened as an HC Capwell department store in the ‘20s, at the time apparently a very big ticket for Oakland as thousands showed up to see the mayor overturn the first shovelful of dirt on the future shopping hub.

Eventually, the building transitioned into being a Sears store instead, and for many years now has laid mostly dormant.

Developer Lane Partners spearheaded efforts to turn the disused retail Mecca into a new mixed-use office building before selling to Uber in 2016.

Square won’t actually move in until the end of 2019, possibly because CIM Group is still overseeing work that’s being done on the nearly century-old building.

“Oakland is committed to attracting businesses whose values align with our community. […] I believe Square can be that company,” Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf said Thursday.

 

 

Read more on Curbed SF

 

 

Demand for apartment rentals surges unexpectedly as home sales slump

Surging demand and strong occupancy in the nation’s apartment market is “surprising” experts who say the continued strength is “unexpected.”

Just a year ago, as dozens of cranes swarmed over major U.S. cities, there was concern that the rental apartment market was overheated and overbuilt.

Apartment absorption, which is the rate at which new units are rented out, is now at the highest level in three years, according to the U.S. Census. Apartment construction took off in 2012 and reached a 20-year high in 2017. It remained elevated this year, despite warnings that demand would slow as more millennials aged into their homebuying years.

And while buyer demand did surge, sales were thwarted by tight supply that has pushed prices higher in the past few years, weakening affordability. When mortgage rates surged this year, even fewer people were left with the means to buy a home.

“People underestimate how far away from homeownership a lot of renters across the country, even in luxury apartment buildings, are,” said John Pawlowski, residential sector head at Green Street Advisors. “The demand has been better than expected. It’s been a stickier tenant base and pricing power at that tenant base, again in the face of elevated supply, has simply surprised us.”

The third quarter of this year marks the fourth consecutive quarter of positive operating “surprises” for apartments, according to a recent report from Green Street, which noted that the asset values of these apartment properties remain on firmer footing than most core property types. Apartment earnings were also better than expected.

 

 

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