Google is gearing up to buy prime San Jose land for a new tech campus. What now?

As the city of San Jose gets ready to release long-anticipated documents related to the sale of 20 acres of land near downtown, the question on the minds of both boosters of the Google expansion and skeptics is “what now?”

The city of San Jose is on the verge of releasing details of a controversial 17-month negotiation to sell 20 acres of publicly owned land to tech giant Google for a massive new campus near downtown.

Those details, set to be released Friday, are a key milestone, but only the first step of making the Bay Area’s largest city one of the next expansion points for Alphabete Inc.-owned Google, a plan that has been met by community members with both excitement, deep disdain, and as of this week, a lawsuit over transparency.

Now, as the release date of the long-anticipated land sale documents near, the question on the minds of both boosters of the Google expansion and skeptics is “what now?”

First, the end goal: Google has said it wants to build a mixed-use campus that could span as large as 8 million square feet and would include housing, retail, and office space next to transit. Somewhere between 15,000 and 20,000 workers could show up each day at the campus if built out fully.

 

 

Read more on Silicon Valley Business Journal

 

 

 

NAI Northern California Represents $11.4M Sale of Eureka Safeway

Eureka, Calif – NAI Northern California, the Bay Area presence for NAI Global, the largest commercial real estate brokerage network in the world, is proud to announce the $11.4 million sale of the Eureka Safeway grocery store.

Executive Vice President Doug Sharpe represented the buyer who purchased the property for less than the asking price.

“Opportunities such as these come infrequently: great location, great building, great team. This asset fit perfectly with the unique circumstances presented by the buyer,” said Sharpe of NAI Northern California.

The acquisition of the 49,145 SF Safeway offers the buyer a rare retail opportunity in Eureka as the only national grocery store in town, making it the go-to market. Situated at the northeast corner Harris Street and Harrison Ave., nearly 60,000 drivers pass the store daily.

Because of Sharpe’s professional commitment to relationship building, he was able to bring the buyer and the seller together to reach a mutually beneficial deal. Speaking about the way this deal came together, Sharpe quoted Zig Ziglar, the well-known motivational speaker, teacher and trainer, “‘If people like you, they’ll listen to you; but if they trust you, they’ll do business with you.’”

The Safeway terms include a brand new 20-year absolute NNN lease with fixed rent increases, providing the buyer with an excellent long-term investment that hedges against future market inflation with no landlord responsibilities.

 

About NAI Northern California

NAI Northern California is a full-service commercial real estate firm serving the Northern California Bay Area. Our team delivers technology-enabled commercial real estate services that create value for our clients, industry, and communities.

NAI Northern California is a partner of NAI Global, the largest commercial real estate brokerage network with more than 400 offices worldwide and over 7,000 professionals completing in excess of $20 billion in commercial real estate transactions globally.

To learn more, visit nainorcal.com.

Square Inc. expands Mid-Market headquarters office in one of San Francisco’s biggest office leases this year

Payments processing company Square Inc. added another 104,135 square feet to its Mid-Market headquarters in San Francisco.

The company will now occupy a total of 469,056 square feet in 1455 Market St., a 1 million-square-foot office building.

The deal was one of the largest of the second quarter for landlord Hudson Pacific Properties (NYSE: HPP), which reported earnings Wednesday.

“We had a strong second quarter, particularly in terms of leasing,” said Victor Coleman, Hudson Pacific Properties’ chairman and CEO, in a statement. “Already standout West Coast market fundamentals continued to improve.”

Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey started Square in 2009 with 10 employees. The company’s technology enables business owners to process credit card payments and makes a credit card reader for cell phones. The company reported revenue of $809 million in 2017 and now has about 2,300 employees in San Francisco, Canada, Japan, Australia, Ireland, and the United Kingdom.

Square first moved into 150,000 square feet in 1455 Market in 2012 with plans to expand into 327,423 square feet over time. The company was among a wave of tech companies that flooded into Mid-Market during a revitalization of the area that is still in process.

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

 

 

Millennial migration favors San Jose despite cost of living, says census

The Bay Area is getting more mixed messages on the seemingly perennial question of if and how quickly residents are fleeing the region and the state.

The finance company Smart Asset released a report Friday claiming that San Jose is one of the most popular destinations for millennials on the move despite its high cost of living.

Smart Asset economist Derek Miller sorted through U.S. Census data to figure out which U.S. cities got the greatest inflow—i.e., the margin of new residents relocating to a city over the number of those moving away—with the ever-topical millennial demographic, here defined as anyone between the ages of 20 and 34 in 2016.

Suffice to say, San Francisco did not acquit itself well with the trend, despite previous census analyses revealing that the city’s median age is gradually getting younger with each passing year. Instead, millennial movers reportedly favored San Jose, which came in seventh place on Miller’s list, the only California city to break the top ten.

 

 

Read more on Curbed SF

 

 

After two projects sank, can San Francisco find developers for decaying waterfront?

The new effort is one of the largest but also potentially costliest redevelopment opportunities in the city.

The Port of San Francisco is seeking ideas for new uses at 13 historic waterfront piers, in one of the largest but also potentially one of the costliest redevelopment opportunities in the city.

The agency wants proposals from both large developers and smaller tenants such as nonprofits, arts groups and retailers to revive the piers, which are now vacant or used for parking or storage.

Some previously renovated piers have been financial successes. Waterfront offices at the Ferry Building and Piers 1 1/2, 3 and 5 have signed tenants for rents over $100 per square foot. Control of the Piers later sold for $103 million in 2016, and the Ferry Building is expected to be sold to Hudson Pacific Properties for around $300 million, according to sources tracking the market.

But two recent redevelopment efforts failed because of the high costs of rehabilitating and seismically protecting piers. A study for the Port found that $74 million to $10 million would be required to bring a single pier up to code. Last year TMG Partners and Premier Structures, Inc. exited an office, event and restaurant space proposal at Pier 38 after the cost to repair the pier was expected to be as high as $122 million.

 

 

 

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

 

 

 

China Trade War Threat May Have Died Down, But CRE Is Still On the Front Lines

Chinese presence in U.S. commercial real estate seems to be waning, trade war or no trade war.

The fate of the off-again, on-again specter of an impending U.S.-China trade war may be uncertain, but regardless of what happens with tariffs and exports, the U.S. commercial real estate industry continues to feel the effect of both China’s cold shoulder and the stricter U.S. regulatory environment surrounding foreign investment.

Chinese companies and financial institutions were active in U.S. commercial real estate in recent years, both on the equity side and the debt side, but their presence seems to be waning, trade war or no trade war.

In New York City alone, Bank of China was involved with originating about $5 billion in loans for prominent commercial properties in 2013 and 2014. Bank of China has been party to loans of more than half a billion dollars each for trophy properties in the Big Apple, including the Sony Building at 550 Madison Ave. (originated in 2013), the One Astor Plaza headquarters of Viacom and its MTV studio (2012) and the 63 Madison Ave. home of tenants such as IBM (2015).

Other big Chinese players in the U.S. real estate market over the past few years have included the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China, which financed New York properties including the Bush Tower at 130 W. 42nd St. (2015), and Anbang Insurance Group, one of China’s largest insurance groups.

 

 

Read more on National Real Estate Investor

 

 

Exclusive: Nordstrom to close Stonestown location, leaving S.F. mall anchor-less

Nordstrom is preparing to close one of its San Francisco locations amid monumental shifts in the retail market that have upended the traditional department store model. 

The Seattle-based retailer is set to vacate its 174,000-square-foot location at Stonestown Galleria, according to Retail West Principal Matthew Holmes and another source with knowledge of the decision, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of pending lease negotiations at the property.

Holmes said the plan is for Nordstrom to close the location, which it has leased for the past three decades, leaving GGP another opportunity to backfill it with smaller tenants.

“It was never the grand Nordstrom like it is downtown,” Holmes said of the retailer’s 350,000-square-foot Market Street location. “They do so much more business in downtown, because it’s a showcase store for them. They’ve realized they don’t need two stores in San Francisco.

A Nordstrom spokeswoman said in an email that the retailer did not have any store closures to announce. Stonestown Mall operator General Growth Properties’ Darren Iverson, a senior general manager, declined to comment.

 

 

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

 

 

Bitcoin won’t encourage cryptocurrency for real estate, but cryptoeconomics will

As Bitcoin enters the mainstream economy, a number of homebuyers and sellers are starting to use the cryptocurrency to conduct real estate transactions.   

Last year, Southeby’s International Realty sold one of the first single-family homes in Austin, Texas using Bitcoin. The Austin home was sold when Bitcoin prices were $3,429 in September 2017.

In addition to these transactions, other residential real estate properties are being listed for Bitcoin. A recent Forbes article describes how Canter Companies, a full-service investment firm specializing in real estate and asset management projects, recently listed two multi-million dollar homes for sale in Bitcoin. The homes are collectively priced at under $20 million in Bitcoin. And recently, a 27 acre piece of land in Silicon Valley has been listed for sale in Bitcoin, Ether and XRP with a starting price of $16 million.

However, while there are a handful of homes currently listed for sale in Bitcoin, some believe that using Bitcoin for real estate transactions will not result in widespread adoption — At least not until the real estate industry starts to utilize blockchain technology, which in turn will drive the adoption of cryptocurrency transactions.

While Bitcoin is stepping into society’s massive adoption as a decentralized cryptocurrency, the next-generation blockchain technology  brings a lot more to the real estate world than just a payment alternative. For example, Propy is based on the Ethereum blockchain, an enormously powerful shared global infrastructure that can move value around, while also representing the ownership of property. Ultimately, this enables title deed transfers to take place entirely online. Imagine a world where you can buy or sell your property while sitting on your couch – now this is a reality with blockchain technology, Natalia Karayaneva, CEO of Propy, told me.

According to Karayaneva, the only way to encourage homebuyers and sellers to take advantage of cryptocurrency for real estate transactions is to take a “cryptoeconomics” approach, which goes much further than simply putting homes up for sale in Bitcoin.

Cryptoeconomics lays out the framework for the way in which cryptocurrency ecosystems thrive and function across a decentralized network, known as the blockchain. These ecosystems are able to allow a number of entities who do not know one another to reliably reach consensus across an anonymous, trustworthy network through the use of cryptocurrencies. This is achieved by using a combination of economic incentives and basic cryptographic tools.

 

 

Read more from Forbes

 

 

 

San Jose mixed-use apartments eyed west of Google village

Plans for a mixed-use apartment and retail complex have sprouted west of downtown San Jose, a development that would bring more than 100 residences to an area known as the Midtown district.

The proposed development at 259 Meridian Ave. near West San Carlos Street would consist of 110 to 120 residential units and 2,300 square feet of retail, according to documents on file with San Jose city planners.

“The city has been encouraging development within an urban village planning process for this area,” said Jerry Strangis, a principal executive with Strangis Properties, a realty firm that is the project consultant for the development. Strangis wouldn’t identify the principal developer of the property.

 

Read more from The Mercury News

 

 

Oakland’s exclusive deal to sell city-owned land to charter school draws opposition

The City of Oakland is poised to sell a large plot of land it owns in the Fruitvale neighborhood to a private developer for the purpose of building a new charter school campus.

But the project — and the city’s years-long involvement in it — is suddenly drawing criticism from education and affordable housing activists who say it reflects Oakland’s lack of transparency when deciding how to use public property.

Under the proposed terms of the deal, the city will sell a 9,000-square-foot parcel on Derby Avenue between International Boulevard and E. 15th Street for $450,000. The buyer, an Idaho-based company called Pacific West Communities, Inc. plans to construct a new school campus on the site for the Aspire charter organization’s ERES Academy, a K-8th grade school. The campus was approved by the city planning commission last month.

ERES Academy’s staff say the new facility is critical because the building they’re currently in — located one mile away on Courtland Avenue and leased from a church — is too small.

“The physical nature of the classrooms is super-constrained,” Aspire’s Dean of Students Jesse Johnson told the city planning commission last month. “The children are bumping into each other. It’s crammed.”

ERES Academy currently has 217 students, according to state records, but Aspire, which operates 40 charter schools in California and Tennessee, hopes to grow. The proposed new school campus could accommodate more than 600 students.

City staff say the land deal will put the property, which used to be part of an auto dealership, back into productive use, and that new charter school is in the public’s interest. They also say the city is coming out financially ahead by selling the land.

 

Read more from East Bay Express