Bill could add millions of new homes next to California’s public transit stations

California State Senator Scott Wiener proposed a trio of new housing bills on Thursday, including one that would make it easier to build taller projects near public transit.

Wiener (D-San Francisco)’s SB 827 calls for the statewide removal of single-family home and parking requirements for projects within a half-mile of transit hubs like BART, Muni and Caltrain stations.

The bill would mandate height limits of at least 45 feet to 85 feet for new projects, depending on how close they are to transit. Cities would be able to raise height limits beyond those minimums, and developers could also build smaller projects within the areas if they chose.

Read more from San Francisco Business Times

Alameda County Planning To Sell Its Stake In Oakland Coliseum To Oakland

Alameda County wants out of its share of the Oakland Coliseum.

With three sports teams potentially leaving the site in the next few years, Oakland and the county are in talks for the city to buy out the county’s stake, the San Francisco Business Times reports. Full control of the site would make it easier for Oakland to redevelop the site.

The city and county still have bonds worth $200M to pay off that were used to finance the expansion of the stadium for the Oakland Raiders and renovate Oracle Arena. Those bonds could complicate negotiations. The county could pay off its portion of the debt, but there is no indication as to how the debt is structured and whether it can be paid off early.

Read more from Bisnow

California’s Cannabis Conundrum: Legalization Will Lead To Fewer Dispensaries, Not More

With legalization of recreational marijuana just around the corner in California, the state is about to embark on what could be a $5B industry and a boon for tax revenue. But state regulations have created high barriers to entry and many cities and counties have banned cannabis outright.

Legalization in California will not translate to an immediate influx of cannabis dispensaries. In fact, many dispensaries now in business will no longer be able to continue operations past Jan. 1. States like Colorado created a more open market with fewer regulations when it legalized recreational marijuana in 2012, leading to an explosion of cannabis businesses. California requires dispensaries to be at least 600 feet from schools, to close at 10 p.m. and to have 24-hour surveillance, among other regulations. Jurisdictions also have the right to be more restrictive.

Read more from Bisnow

BART, Concord eye vacant site for affordable housing

BART may partner with the city to bring much-needed affordable rental housing to a vacant property a few blocks from the downtown station.

The transit agency owns a 9-acre parcel between Monument Boulevard and San Miguel Road that sits just south of the Concord skate park. Although a canal runs through the property, city staffers believe at least part of it could be developed.

BART works with local communities to develop high-density housing at its stations. Such mixed-use developments are under construction at the Walnut Creek, MacArthur and Coliseum stations, however the Concord project would be the first built on an off-site BART property, according to spokesman Jim Allison.

Read more from East Bay Times

4 Ways that Driverless Cars Could Impact the CRE Industry

Companies ranging from the big automakers in Detroit to tech firms in Silicon Valley are pouring research dollars into driverless cars, and this development is projected to completely change the future of commercial real estate. This transition creates opportunities for new investment as well as challenges for existing properties.

Read more from NAI Global

Downtown San Jose blighted blocks may get new life

SAN JOSE — A plan to build several dozen residential units in downtown San Jose is part of wide-ranging efforts to transform some blighted blocks, decaying buildings and vacant lots in the city’s urban heart into a vibrant community.

“Ultimately this is going to be a great, brand-new neighborhood in downtown San Jose,” said Bob Staedler, principal executive with Silicon Valley Synergy, a land-use and planning consultancy. “This area north of San Pedro Square has always been the hole in the doughnut of the downtown.”

Read more from East Bay Times

Greenprint Report Shows Real Estate Industry Continues to Reduce Energy Consumption, Carbon Emissions, Water Use

A new report from the ULI Greenprint Center for Building Performance shows that several of the world’s leading commercial real estate owners and managers are making significant progress in reducing energy consumption, carbon emissions, and water use in their buildings.

Since Greenprint started tracking building performance in 2009, the energy consumed by members’ properties has dropped 13.9 percent, carbon emissions have decreased 17.9 percent, and water use has dropped by 12.1 percent. The reductions occurred even as building occupancy rose, suggesting that greater space use does not necessarily cause a decline in building performance.

Read more from Urban Land Institute

Alameda may hire firm in bid to attract tech companies to former base

ALAMEDA — Buildings that once housed U.S. Navy sailors could be transformed into a campus for a technology company under a city proposal.

Known as the Bachelor Enlisted Quarters (BEQ), the buildings are on 21 acres and have been mostly vacant since the Alameda Naval Air Station closed more than 20 years ago. Efforts to use them for civilian housing have long stalled.

Now city officials are hoping the buildings, which also have been routinely vandalized, can be turned into places where a tech company may want to locate, especially since the large aircraft hangars at the former base are already leased.

Read more from East Bay Times

San Jose council agrees to buy land near Google project amid resident concerns

SAN JOSE — City leaders Tuesday agreed to buy six pieces of land near Google’s proposed tech village for parking and road improvements despite concerns from some residents that taxpayer dollars are being spent to subsidize the tech giant’s private development.

Mayor Sam Liccardo stressed that the land acquisitions approved Tuesday will support improvements that were planned for decades — with or without Google’s proposed tech campus. Liccardo also said the money pegged for the land buys — about $15 million total — was allocated years ago and that $4 million came from Trammell Crow, Google’s development partner.

Read more from The Mercury News

NAI Northern California celebrates continued growth with 21% revenue increase by third quarter of 2017

The tech-forward, collaborative brokerage continues to emerge as an up-and-comer on the Bay Area commercial real estate scene

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – October 17, 2017–  Continuing to evolve as a growing force in the San Francisco Bay Area commercial real estate landscape, NAI Northern California forges into the third quarter of 2017 with revenue already surging past 2016. As of October, the brokerage has increased gross revenue by 21% over last year. Across retail, multifamily, office, industrial, and land, the total square footage of transactions closed by the team more than tripled.

In regards to NAI Northern California’s growth and the current market, President James Kilpatrick points out, “While the Bay Area has been experiencing an extraordinarily long real estate cycle, this seems to be accelerating further as our number of successful transactions is up by 31%.”

Multifamily investment sales are active as investors focus on residents looking beyond San Francisco to the East Bay. Top producing broker Shivu Srinivasan closed the $28.75 million acquisition of an 88 unit apartment complex at 4445 Stevenson Boulevard in Fremont and the $13 million sale of a 70 unit property at 250 West Jackson in Hayward.

In retail, NAI Northern California is carving out a niche by successfully closing over $100 million in triple net shopping centers and single tenant properties this year.Top producer Mary Alam spearheaded the $13.6 million sale of the Newark Shopping Center and several Walgreens properties among others.

Growing market share is directly impacted by the addition of talent. In 2017, experienced industry professionals Tony Alanis, Kevin Flaherty, Fritz Jacobs, Matt Gorman, Gregg Steele, Reggie Regino, Brent Stiggins, and Darija Walker joined the company’s brokerage and financing groups.

James Kilpatrick remarks, “Our growth is truly predicated on our talented team. We are unique in the commercial real estate industry, empowering our professionals to take a collaborative approach supported by a tech-forward platform that helps them be nimble as they get deals done for our clients.”

About NAI Northern California
NAI Northern California is a progressive, full service commercial real estate firm serving the Bay Area. Recognized as one of the Top 25 Commercial Real Estate Firms by the East Bay and San Francisco Business Times, we are committed to delivering best in class services for our clients.

www.nainorcal.com