Development without gentrification? Oakland’s Fruitvale is the model, report says

Oakland’s Fruitvale transit village has been a boon to the surrounding community without gentrification

The cluster of shops, community service organizations and apartments at the Fruitvale BART station may not seem all that different from other commercial plazas, but to some economists and urban planners, it’s the grand prize of development — at least, for now.

Researchers from UCLA’s Latino Policy and Politics Initiative say the transit village has been a boon to the surrounding neighborhood without resulting in gentrification. As many low-income and working class residents across the state are forced to leave urban areas due to rising rents and home prices, the UCLA researchers said Oakland’s Fruitvale neighborhood has held onto its existing residents, along with its signature Mexican-American culture.

“It’s the holy grail of urban planning,” said Alexander Quinn, an economist with Hatch, who reviewed the study’s findings, “to say we improved the place and the people who live there are better off.”

But long-time residents, academics and elected officials question whether Oakland’s Mexican-American mecca can continue to withstand the pressure of the region’s booming economy.  And, to them, the tide may already be turning.

Read more from East Bay Times

 

 

Exclusive: Chinese developer brings on local development muscle as it digs into Santa Clara megaproject

A Chinese company has brought on local development help as it studies the feasibility of building a 10.5 million-square-foot mixed-use development in Santa Clara — a project that local insiders say could get even bigger.

The Chinese developer working on getting approvals for a 10.5 million-square-foot-development on a former Yahoo site in Santa Clara appears to have forged a formal relationship with a local developer to help with the process.

Harmonie Park Development last week announced in a tweet it was “excited to be named development advisor to Kylli.”

Kylli Inc., an American subsidiary of Shenzhen, China-based pharmaceuticals and real estate company Genzon, earlier this year got unanimous approval from Santa Clara City Council members to study amending the city’s general plan to grow the allowed development for the 48.6-acre site roughly at 3005 Democracy Way more than three-fold.

One local land use consultant now says the project could get even bigger, according to conversations he’s had with people purporting to be involved with the project.

Read more from Silicon Valley Business Journal

 

 

San Francisco evictions in decline, less than two-thirds of state average

Only half of eviction notices lead to actual ouster, according to Princeton database

San Francisco landlords evict tenants at less than two-thirds the rate of the average California city.

That’s the conclusion from Princeton University’s recently launched Eviction Lab, which compiles data from 48 states and Washington DC to get a bird’s-eye view of what eviction in the U.S. looks like. In 2016, Princeton recorded roughly 2.3 million evictions coast to coast, around one per every 140 citizens.

Compared to that, California’s rate of one eviction per 933 residents—41,178 evictions total in 2016—looks almost rosy; however, it’s not wise to use those kinds of terms when talking about tens of thousands of people losing their homes.

And in San Francisco the news is even more potentially comforting for renters. A few takeaways from the data:

  • Eviction Lab reports 593 SF evictions the same year, one per every 1,417 people (Eviction Lab uses an estimated SF population of 841,000 for 2016, which is actually on the low side), a rate of about 63.5 percent of the state average.
  • The database also records some 1,176 eviction filings the same year, meaning that the success rate of attempted evictions in SF was just over 50 percent. In the rest of the state it was more than 87 percent.
  • Overall, California had 112.51 evictions per day in 2016. SF had just 1.62, or just less than 1.44 percent of the state eviction rate.
  • Although Eviction Lab records a median rent in SF more than $300 pricier than the state average, the city’s median income also outstripped California average by over $19,000.

Before uncorking the champagne, note that there are some discrepancies between Princeton’s and San Francisco’s data sets.

Read more from Curbed SF

 

 

 

California Senate stalls transit-housing bill

Citing not enough affordable housing, vote against leaves Senator Scott Wiener’s signature bill in limbo

After months of public wrangling and amendment, San Francisco’s State Senator Scott Wiener finally brought his signature transit-housing bill SB 827 before the Senate Transportation and Housing Committee in Sacramento Tuesday, where it stalled on a 6-4 vote that leaves it in limbo.

SB 827 would have radically changed how California cities zone for height and density by making it illegal to place height limits below four to five stories (depending on the locale) along major transit routes.

Thanks to San Francisco’s extensive bus network, this would have applied to virtually every parcel in the city. But even cities with far less skin in the game, like Lafayette and Berkeley, complained that the bill redirected too much control from local municipalities to the state.

Calling local control “important but not biblical,” Wiener again labored on Tuesday to frame the bill as a necessary step given the scope of the crisis.

Read more from Curbed SF

 

 

 

Huge investors chase San Francisco’s $300 million Ferry Building

The 1889 building is drawing interest from some of the country’s biggest landlords.

Some of the country’s biggest real estate investors want to buy control of San Francisco’s iconic Ferry Building in a deal that could exceed $300 million.

Kilroy Realty Corp, Hudson Pacific Properties In.c, Invesco Plc, and Thor Equities, are all competing to acquire the building, according to five, sources. A buyer could be selected within a month, said the sources.

The pending deal is another sign of San Francisco’s enduring appeal for major office investors as rents have jumped and little supply is being added.

The 1889 Ferry Building at the eastern terminus of Market Street includes 175,000 square feet of office space and 65, 000 square feet of retail in a popular ground-floor marketplace. The building and its weekly farmer’s markets draw tens of thousands of visitors a week. Its office space with waterfront views also commands some of the highest rents in the city, up to $100 per square feet.

Read more from San Francisco Business Times 

 

 

Nine Things To Keep In Mind About Blockchain In Real Estate

Blockchain is the next frontier of the real estate market, making inroads at a fast clip.

The use of the technology will make it possible to have transparent transactions that sellers and buyers will benefit from. From real-time ledgers to full-on shared databases and processes, blockchain throws the doors wide open with possibilities in real estate. However, does it come at a cost?

Some agents think it might, while others are embracing it with abandon. Yet, there is much to learn and consider before adopting blockchain into your business processes.

Nine members of Forbes Real Estate Council share the thing that everyone in their profession needs to know in order to safely and efficiently begin adopting blockchain or the tools it enables.

Read more from Forbes

 

 

San Francisco’s homeless crisis is driving tourists away

San Francisco’s hotels are facing a serious problem.

The city’s idyllic image of the Golden Gate bridge and grandiose views of the bay are being replaced by concerns about needles and feces littering the streets, homeless citizens sleeping on sidewalks or in Bay Area Rapid Transit stations and aggression toward visitors by people with untreated mental illness. Visitors are noticing and rethinking booking events and vacations at hotels around the city.

San Francisco’s homeless population was down by 0.5% in 2017 compared to 2015, but is about 17% higher compared to 2013, according to SFist. While homelessness is nothing new for the city, hoteliers and local business say street conditions have worsened.

Within 153 blocks in downtown, there were over 300 piles of feces, 100 drug needles and trash on every block, a recent report by NBCBayArea revealed. Complaints of poor street conditions to 311 have skyrocketed in recent years. In 2016, 311, a city agency where visitors and residents can report issues or seek information about the city, received 44,000 complaints of encampments, human waste and needles, up from 6,300 complaints in 2011, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

“[Visitors] are noticing it and hearing about it and saying, ‘well, why would I bring my conference here?’” Hotel Council of San Francisco Executive Director Kevin Carroll said.

Visitors often have rave reviews for the local restaurants and hotel service, but say they will not come back or will not bring their families here, he said.

San Francisco is not the only major West Coast city dealing with issues of homelessness and street conditions impacting tourism and hospitality. Anaheim, home to Disneyland with its spotless, litter-free Main Street, U.S.A., has the stark contrast of homeless people who live just outside the park. The city has been looking into ways to help its homeless population, such as providing emergency shelter and employment opportunities. Honolulu also took action in recent years on cleaning up the streets, including around its popular Waikiki area.

Read more from Bisnow

 

 

 

Google says it’s close to owning enough downtown San Jose properties for ‘viable’ development

Google is nearing ownership of enough downtown San Jose properties and parcels to create a “viable” transit-oriented development.

The development will take place near the Diridon train station, a top company executive told a key advisory group this week.

During a meeting of the Station Area Advisory Group, formed to gather and process citizen input about Google’s proposal to develop a massive transit village near Diridon Station, Google executives offered the company’s first major presentation of its development philosophies and plans for downtown San Jose. The search giant also indicated that it is creating a critical mass of properties where it could build a transit-oriented community downtown.

“Just to get the sites together by itself is obviously very complicated, and it’s not completed yet, and it’s taking a while,” Mark Golan, Google’s vice president real estate development, told the advisory group during its Monday night meeting. “But we are getting close to having a site that is viable.”

Mountain View-based Google and its development ally Trammell Crow have spent at least $221.6 million buying an array of properties on the western edges of downtown San Jose, within and near a one-mile stretch that begins north of the SAP Center and reaches south nearly to Interstate 280.

Among the major recent deals: The Google and Trammell Crow venture bought a large site that now is occupied by Orchard Supply Hardware, and the search giant has struck a deal to purchase a huge property from Trammell Crow that is approved for 1 million square feet, hundreds of residences and retail.

Despite the extensive work and investments that have occurred already, construction isn’t going to begin tomorrow, Google executives cautioned.

Read more from Santa Cruz Sentinel

 

 

San Francisco’s largest office landlord to break ground on $265 million Oakland tower

Boston Properties, San Francisco’s largest office landlord, will break ground on May 2 on a 402-unit apartment tower next to Oakland’s MacArthur BART station.

The 260-foot project at 532 39th St. will be the tallest building in North Oakland and the company’s first residential project on the West Coast.

The project in the Temescal district will be among a half-dozen Oakland towers to start construction in the last two years, an unprecedented real estate boom that’s drawing some of the country’s biggest developers to the city. Other developers include Lennar Multifamily Communities, Shorenstein Properties and Carmel Partners.

Read more from San Francisco Business Times

 

 

Facebook to move into big WeWork outpost as co-working company prepares to open largest-ever location

Talks between the two giants about WeWork’s new Mountain View location, its largest sublease to-date, have been ongoing for months. But this week the two finally struck a deal.

When WeWork this year opens its first Mountain View offices — its largest-ever lease — half of that space will be filled by Facebook.

Both companies told the Silicon Valley Business Journal about Facebook’s sublease which totals more than 200,000 square feet in one of two new office buildings at The Village at San Antonio Center. The deal comes after months of discussions between the two companies. The second WeWork office building on the site will be open to any company seeking co-working space.

Initially, the talks between the New York-based co-working company and the Menlo Park-based tech giant had been leading toward Facebook taking over both buildings at 391 and 401 San Antonio Road, which would total about 450,000 square feet, the Business Journal reported in February. But Facebook in recent months has rapidly snapped up huge swaths of office space in Silicon Valley — including about 1 million square feet in Sunnyvale — and its needs evolved quickly, two sources with knowledge of the discussions told the Business Journal.

Facebook will set up shop in the eight-story, approximately 225,000-square-foot office building at 401 San Antonio Rd., which is slated to be ready for move-in by early September, according to WeWork.

Read more from Silicon Valley Business Journal