Shivu Srinivasan of NAI Northern California named a Top 10 NAI Global Top Producer

Bay Area multifamily investment property top producer ranks among NAI Global’s top sales leaders internationally

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – May 15, 2018 – NAI Global, a leading global commercial real estate brokerage firm, recently announced that Shivu Srinivasan, Senior Vice President, NAI Northern California was recognized in its annual recognition program as a top producer for the organization. The award honors individuals who are handling the highest volume of multi-market business within NAI. The awards will be presented at the 2018 NAI Global Convention in Austin, Texas this September.

“This award represents outstanding performance within the organization,” said Jay Olshonsky, President, NAI Global. “We are proud of Shivu Srinivasan’s success, and the dedication and commitment to service excellence he has shown. It underscores the power of NAI Global in building business and showcases the deep local roots and professionalism of our professionals.”

Shivu Srinivasan is a Vice President at NAI Northern California, specializing in multifamily investment properties and portfolios in the East Bay market.

In 2016, just his second year in brokerage, Shivu was ranked as NAI Northern California’s number one producing broker. With a total sales volume of $38 million, he was also ranked by CoStar as third in the East Bay market as well as third in number of total transactions at 14.

In 2017, just his third year in brokerage, Shivu was again ranked as NAI Northern California’s number one producing broker. With a total sales volume of ~$90 million, he was the number one producing non-institutional broker in Alameda County. His marquee sales of the year included an 88 unit transaction in Fremont for $26.5 million,  a 70 unit transaction he listed in Hayward for $13.2 million, and a high profile portfolio sale in Oakland’s Lake Merritt district, which included three buildings for $13 million.

“Shivu came to NAI Northern California a few years ago with a talented sales background and quickly transformed that into a successful commercial real estate sales machine within our organization,” remarks James Kilpatrick, President and Founder.

On Shivu’s contributions to propelling NAI Northern California forward, James remarks, “Within his first full year he was already in our top 10 agents and dialed his way to the Top Caller of the Year Award. Now Shivu heads up a powerhouse team of agents who dominate East Bay multifamily real estate sales.”

About NAI Northern California
NAI Northern California is a full service commercial real estate firm serving the Northern California Bay Area. Our team delivers technology-enabled commercial real estate services that create value for our clients, industry, and communities.

NAI Northern California is a partner of NAI Global, the largest commercial real estate brokerage network with more than 400 offices worldwide and over 7,000 professionals completing in excess of $20 billion in commercial real estate transactions globally.

About NAI Global
NAI Global is a leading global commercial real estate brokerage firm. NAI Global offices are leaders in their local markets and work in unison to provide clients with exceptional solutions to their commercial real estate needs. NAI Global has more than 400 offices strategically located throughout North America, Latin America, Europe, Africa and Asia Pacific, with over 7,000 local market professionals, managing in excess of over 425 million square feet of property.  Annually, NAI Global completes in excess of $20 billion in commercial real estate transactions throughout the world.

NAI Global was acquired in 2012 by C-III Capital Partners, a leading commercial real estate services company engaged in a broad range of activities, including primary and special loan servicing, loan origination, fund management, CDO management, principal investment, online capital markets, title services and multifamily property management. C-III’s principal place of business is located in Irving, TX, with additional offices in New York, NY, Greenville, SC and Nashville, TN.

To learn more, visit www.naiglobal.com and www.naiglobalnewslink.com

 

 

Housing high-rise breaks ground outside Oakland’s MacArthur BART station

The tallest building of BART’s biggest residential development broke ground Wednesday in Oakland, promising to house hundreds of families feet from the MacArthur station when it opens in 2020.

The 24-story, 402-unit high-rise dubbed Skylyne will be one of the largest apartment buildings in the city. It had been in the making for more than a decade, and developers in recent years sought to more than double the tower’s height as demand for housing surged.

The neighborhood’s zoning doesn’t allow buildings above 90 feet, but developers McGrath Properties and Boston Properties got an exemption for setting aside 45 units for affordable housing and making investments in local parks and community programs. At 260 feet tall, the building will include 13,000 square feet of commercial space on the ground floor.

“Unleash the mammoth!” developer Terry McGrath said at a groundbreaking ceremony.

 

Read more from SFGate

 

 

Builders, Developers Focus On Ways To Save Costs, Build More Housing Units In Oakland, Bay Area

With rising construction costs, a costly entitlement process and labor shortages, Bay Area developers are looking into new ways to build housing more cost-effectively.

Developers are utilizing density bonuses, adding more efficiencies into construction, exploring modular units and prefab and experimenting with new techniques to keep costs down and get more projects off the ground.

Even though there are 17,000 units at different planning stages in Oakland, many of these units rent in the $3K to $4K range, which is not affordable for a majority of people in the Bay Area, oWow founder Danny Haber said during Bisnow’s Alameda County Multifamily and Mixed-Use event in Oakland.

His company’s focus has been on creating macro-units with efficient design that lead to three- and four-bedroom units that are more cost-effective to build and end up being 50% more affordable than their market-rate counterparts.

“The biggest amenity today … is affordable housing and access to jobs and opportunities to work,” Haber said.

Read more from Bisnow

 

 

San Francisco’s largest office landlord to break ground on $265 million Oakland tower

Boston Properties, San Francisco’s largest office landlord, will break ground on May 2 on a 402-unit apartment tower next to Oakland’s MacArthur BART station.

The 260-foot project at 532 39th St. will be the tallest building in North Oakland and the company’s first residential project on the West Coast.

The project in the Temescal district will be among a half-dozen Oakland towers to start construction in the last two years, an unprecedented real estate boom that’s drawing some of the country’s biggest developers to the city. Other developers include Lennar Multifamily Communities, Shorenstein Properties and Carmel Partners.

Read more from San Francisco Business Times

 

 

Wiener scales back bill that would allow taller housing near public transit

State Sen. Scott Wiener scales back a controversial housing proposal.

The proposed bill would strip local governments of their ability to block construction of taller and denser apartment and condominium buildings near public transit stops, and conceded the bill might not make it through the Legislature this year.

The San Francisco Democrat introduced amendments to his SB827 late Monday that would lower the maximum height of buildings that could go up as a result of the bill to five stories from eight. Also, the bill would take effect in 2021 instead of 2019.

Wiener made the amendments ahead of the bill’s first hearing April 17 in the Senate Transportation and Housing Committee. If passed, the bill will then head to the Senate Governance and Finance Committee.

“The bill is not guaranteed to survive either committee,” Wiener said Tuesday. “It’s a hard bill. Hopefully, we pass through these committees and live to fight another day, but if not, then we will try again next year. It’s very common in the Legislature that for hard bills, sometimes you have to try multiple times.”

The measure would override local height limits on proposed four- and five-story apartment and condo buildings in residential areas if they are within a half mile of major transit hubs, such as a BART or Caltrain station. It also would limit cities’ ability to block denser buildings within a quarter-mile of highly used bus and light-rail stops, but amendments eliminated new height requirements.

Read more from San Francisco Chronicle

 

 

Housing for North Berkeley BART?

BART and city leaders recently took the first steps toward a mixed-use housing development on the station’s parking lots, but there’s still a long road ahead.

In its early days, BART bulldozed houses to build massive parking lots for commuters to San Francisco, devastating several low-income communities in the East Bay. But then in the mid-1990s, the transit agency started a shift toward building housing, office, and retail around its stations instead. And during the past 15 years or so, the agency has been planning developments at most of its stations with surface parking lots — including projects at Ashby station in Berkeley and at most of its above-ground Oakland stations.

But the stations surrounding some of BART’s most desirable real estate have been excluded from development planning so far. For example, despite high home prices around the Rockridge BART station in North Oakland and the fact that it’s only a 20-minute ride to downtown San Francisco, BART has produced no development plans for the area to date.

For North Berkeley, a 25-minute ride from San Francisco, BART has at least considered building on the land. An overview of BART’s transit-oriented development strategy provided to this reporter last year included a map of existing, planned, and future development. North Berkeley was listed as a site for potential future development with 100-percent affordable housing, but BART had no more specific plans than that.

Read more from East Bay Express

 

 

Oakland creates new policy director position to deal with housing crisis

Mayor Libby Schaaf has named Darin Ranelletti as the city’s first policy director for housing security, a position the mayor created and hopes will help ease Oakland’s affordable housing crisis.

Ranelletti is no stranger around City Hall: He has spent the past 15 years in the planning and building department, most recently as the interim director. In his new policy role, Ranelletti is expected to promote new housing available to all income levels and work to protect longtime residents from being pushed out of Oakland’s market.

“This new position gives the Mayor’s Office the resources needed to address the housing crisis effectively and with urgency,” Schaaf said in a statement Thursday. “Darin’s 360-degree perspective begins with his work in the City’s Planning & Building Department to increase Oakland’s housing production at a record pace this year, as well as his recent efforts to protect tenants and safeguard our city’s affordable housing stock. He also has a deep passion and commitment to equity.”

Read more at East Bay Times

New Oakland law could prevent cannabis companies from evicting tenants

The Oakland City Council will hold a special meeting on Thursday to discuss new legislation that, if passed, could prevent cannabis companies who own real estate from displacing existing tenants.

The proposed amendments to the city’s cannabis ordinances, Oakland Municipal Code Chapters 5.80 and 5.81, prohibit the issuance of any approvals for cannabis businesses seeking to operate in spaces currently occupied by work-live or residential uses.

Oakland council member Rebecca Kaplan, the co-author of the proposed legislation, says the amendments balance the city’s support of the cannabis industry with protections for work-live spaces, thus supporting a diverse industrial sector in Oakland.

Read more from KQED

Transit-village housing in Oakland’s Fruitvale gets going, after years of delays

Affordable housing complex a happy milestone for the dozen or so elected officials in attendance.

With BART trains rattling past in the background, several hundred people gathered last week under a white tent to celebrate the groundbreaking of Casa Arabella, a 94-unit affordable-housing complex going up on a surface parking lot just south of the Fruitvale BART Station.

It was a happy milestone for the dozen or so elected officials in attendance. The project, developed by the Unity Council and the East Bay Asian Local Development Corp., will be affordable to households with incomes in the extremely low and very-low categories. Twenty units will be reserved for formerly homeless veterans. It will be followed by another 181 units, which Unity Council CEO Chris Iglesias hopes to start building in 2019.

But the ceremony also underscored the exasperating length of time that it takes to develop transit-oriented housing on BART-owned land. As several speakers pointed out, it had been 24 years since the community plan for the Fruitvale Transit Village was conceived, and nearly 14 years since the 47-unit first phase opened.

Read more from SFGate

 

 

Exclusive: A 102-year-old East Oakland warehouse has been reborn as offices and artist studios

The project is one of East Oakland’s biggest in years.

The property at 2744 E. 11th St. opened in 1916 as a cannery for H.G. Prince, a company that invented a method to remove pits from fruits – a fitting use in a neighborhood once known for its orchards. Decades later, Lucasey Manufacturing Corp., a maker of television mounts, bought the building and stored products there, part of the blue-collar industry of Oakland.

Another transformation will happen next month, when the building reopens as more than 100,000 square feet of offices, industrial and artist space called Artthaus Studios.

The project will be one of the largest new developments in East Oakland. It is the largest source of modern, renovated artist and maker space in the area, said Riaz Taplin, CEO of Riaz Capital, the project’s developer, general contractor and designer.

“Oakland has really taken this new role within the Bay Area as the home of the creative community. So creating a building to accelerate the innovation of those types of businesses and people and creators and artists was the goal in creating Artthaus Studios,” said Taplin.

Taplin believes the project provides three benefits for smaller businesses and creative companies: It creates collaboration by concentrating various businesses in the same building, it provides a new facility near a BART station and it’s relatively affordable for new space.

“We wanted to tailor the spaces to be for small, young businesses — entrepreneurial, small businesses, ideally in the creative industries,” said Taplin. “We wanted to create an environment, which made them competitive. We want to make it easy to collaborate. We wanted to make it easy for them to seek out customers.”

Read more from San Francisco Business Times