Santa Clara approves agrihood, city’s largest affordable housing project in pipeline

Santa Clara has approved its largest affordable housing project in the pipeline — an “agrihood” that will combine urban living with farm life. 

The city approved the project, a public-private partnership between the city and developer The Core Cos., last week. Called Agrihood, the mixed-income property will have 361 apartments, with 181 of those below market rate, 160 of which will be for low-income seniors. A 1.7-acre urban farm and community retail and open space will complete the neighborhood.

The city had the site earmarked for senior housing for more than a decade.

“This project was borne out of a dire need to bring affordable housing through a truly creative, community-driven process. The Core Companies has kept this mission and urgency at the center of its work and dialogue with the city and community stakeholders,” The Core Cos. Senior Development Manger Vince Cantore said in a statement. “Santa Clara’s seniors have already waited more than a decade for housing at this site. An available below-market home for a senior can be the differentiator between a comfortable, safe environment in which to spend one’s golden years, or an extended period of financial stress and uncertainty.”

 

Read more at Bisnow Silicon Valley

 

With Square move on horizon, fintechs discover Oakland

Square’s expansion into Uptown Station underscores what fintech entrepreneurs have been saying for some time: Oakland is hot and only getting hotter.

Square’s new lease taking all of Oakland’s Uptown Station signals the growing popularity of the East Bay’s largest city for fintechs and other startups.

Fintech entrepreneurs say Square moving into the city in such a big way — the payments company plans to start moving in about 2,000 employees beginning later this year — means a lot more energy and talent will be drawn into Oakland.

Square’s move represents a tripling of Oakland’s fintech workforce, which the city estimates to be just under 1,000 people.

“We have a small but growing tech sector in Oakland,” said Marisa Raya, economic development specialist for the city of Oakland.

 

 

Read more at San Francisco Business Times

 

Lucca Ravioli Co. slated to close as old San Francisco family divests its real estate holdings

Pair of buildings that host beloved deli, seven housing units, readying for sale.

“It’s very important that the marketing photos make the units look good,” tenants told in letter.

The building on the corner of 22nd and Valencia Streets that houses Lucca Ravioli Co., the last commercial outpost of the Feno family, which has done business in San Francisco for nearly 100 years, appears to be readying for sale.

No, not the parking lot next door that already sold for around $3 million in October — the actual building where the ravioli magic has happened since 1925.

That’s not all: The six-unit apartment building next door at 1102-1106 Valencia, which the Feno family also owns, is apparently up for sale, too.

Residential tenants of both buildings received a letter in mid-December stating that representatives of the commercial real-estate firm NAI Northern California — along with Lucca’s owner, Michael Feno — would walk through their apartments for inspections and photos. Their places, the letter said, must be “clean without personal belongings strewn about.”

“These are marketing photos,” the letter reads. “It’s very important that the marketing photos make the units look good.”

The letter adds: “To help incentivize the tenants, we would like to offer those that do a gift-card.”

Of course, this raises questions over whether these tenants will be shooed out of their places to raise the value of the buildings. Tenants, who declined to be interviewed for this piece, are discussing their options.

A Lucca employee confirmed that the deli will close in spring 2019.

1100-1118 Valencia St. is presented for sale by Jordan Geller and J.B. Williams of NAI Northern California. Click here for more details on this listing.

Read more at Mission Local

 

City begins Transit Center repairs but won’t set reopening date

“Repairs are scheduled to be complete by the first week of June 2019.”

The Transbay Joint Powers Authority (TJPA) announced Friday that repairs will finally begin on the Transbay Transit Center, more than four months after mysteriously cracked support beams shuttered the barely-used, $2.2 billion downtown facility.

According to Friday’s statement:

Early morning Saturday, February 2, 2019 , crews will replace the hydraulic jacks on First Street with a shoring system to allow the TJPA to reinforce the girders on the bus deck above First Street.

[…] Steel plates are currently being fabricated offsite and will be delivered to the transit center in March for installation. Repairs are scheduled to be complete by the first week of June 2019 and then the shoring systems at both Fremont and First streets will be removed.

 

Read more at Curbed SF

 

 

Landlord-tenant relationships are changing, thanks to cryptocurrencies, Airbnb, and more

New challenges facing landlords in 2019.

This could be a great time to be a landlord.

The real-estate market still only has enough supply for half the population. We’re still seeing high divorce rates, so people need more places to live. And households are still being created faster than the housing supply. All that combined means higher rents and that trend looks likely to continue for a long time.

In fact, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association, rising rates on 30-year mortgages — now firmly above 5% and on track to reach 5.8% by the end of the year — will help to drive rents higher in the coming year as more people get priced out of home buying by these higher interest rates. According to an analysis by Zillow, rent growth will pick up in 2019 as the Federal Reserve continues to raise rates.

For landlords, this is all very good news. And, given the evolution that the real-estate market has gone through over the last couple of decades — expanding to include short-term rentals, absentee owners, do-it-yourself property managers and more — the future looks bright for all involved.

Read more at MarketWatch