Milpitas’ Great Mall unveils major revamp as Silicon Valley shopping centers up the ante

As retail sputters in some places around the country, Silicon Valley retailers and property owners are facing a different challenge: How to compete in a market where investment is still hot in the retail sector.

The Great Mall in Milpitas is one of those looking for a competitive edge in a region where the traditional malls are either going by the wayside or upping the ante to create a space that offers not just shops, but experiences.

Indianapolis-based Simon, an international shopping center and mixed-use property owner, last month wrapped up an extensive, two-year renovation project for the massive shopping center, which has more than 200 stores. (For fun facts about the revamp, click through the slideshow above.)

The revamp added or expanded some of its stores, but also redesigned what it is calling a “dining pavilion” that has 10 restaurants.

“Our goal is to provide the best shopping and entertainment experience for our guests and this transformative renovation makes that possible,” Angela Pyszczynski, general manager at the Great Mall, said in a statement.

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Tenants start grabbing space in one of the East Bay’s only new office towers

One of the Bay Area’s largest life science landlords, Wareham Development, is now more than a third leased up in its latest project, the 265,000-square-foot EmeryStation West in Emeryville.

The San Rafael-based developer recently completed the building after starting construction back in 2016 with no tenants in hand and now has commitments for 93,000 square feet with Profusa Inc. taking 18,000 square feet and Dynavax Technologies Inc. taking 75,000 square feet.

“We have built the project to the highest-quality research and office building standards and are pleased the market recognizes that,” said Geoffrey Sears, a partner at Wareham, in a statement.

The building, designed by Perkins + Will, contains seven stories of office and lab space above two levels for transit and parking. DPR Construction served as the general contractor.

The building is part of Wareham’s 2 million-square-foot EmeryStation research and technology campus and is the latest addition to the company’s broader 4.5 million-square-foot portfolio in the Bay Area.

Wareham, led by CEO Rich Robbins, has specialized in developing biotech and life science buildings in Emeryville, Berkeley, Richmond and Palo Alto. Before EmeryStation West, the last new office building in Emeryville was Wareham’s 99,000-square-foot EmeryStation Greenway in 2012. That property was leased up by Stanford Health Care.

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Making heads or tails of the U.S. multifamily sector

If you were to focus solely on the slowing pace of rent gains, burgeoning supply and the rise in interest rates, you might assume that the real estate market isn’t in a strong place right now.

But despite all of the above, the multifamily market is in a healthy position. Demand is being driven by encouraging demographic shifts and a strong economy. Despite moderating elements, because the economy is healthy, the apartment market is similarly healthy, even if the boom from earlier in this economic cycle has tapered off.

GDP growth came in at 2.3% for the year in 2017, and a whopping 4.2% in Q2 2018. Consumers are buying confidently provided that tax cuts will improve yearly income even despite stagnant wage growth. Our multifamily clients are anticipating that U.S. rent growth should maintain its current pace, largely thanks to cities in the South and West, where supply hasn’t outpaced demand.

According to the Spring 2018 Yardi Matrix U. S. Multifamily Outlook report, given the state of supply and demand in most metro areas and the steady economy, rents are projected to increase by 2.9% nationwide this year, with heavy concentration in late-stage southern and western U.S. markets. However, concerns about affordability are keeping prices from rising at an exceptionally fast rate, and new supply is also helping to keep those costs level. As for the supply, completions are expected to maintain the same steady pace they have over the past few years. Absorption rates are anticipated to remain strong for the remainder of the year, and 290,000 additional units are expected to finish construction by 2018, resulting in a 2.2% increase of stock. Another big factor that’s supporting the real estate market is the steady flow of capital pouring into the industry.

 

 

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