Cupertino to get serious tonight about new business tax that could generate millions from Apple

Cupertino’s City Council tonight will consider what kind of restructured business tax it might place on November’s ballot for Apple Inc.’s headquarters city.

The move comes as nearby Mountain View looks like it’s headed toward referendum to place a “head tax” on Alphabet’s Google and other large employers in its boundaries. Public polling in Cupertino has indicated heavy support for something similar there. Such a tax would mostly hit Apple, by far Cupertino’s largest employer.

Just a week ago, the City Council in Seattle — headquarters to Amazon.com — repealed a controversial head tax that it had put on the books just a few weeks earlier, after opposition from Amazon and others in the business community.

No such public threats have been made in Mountain View, but the Cupertino Chamber of Commerce posted a no jobs tax message on Twitter on Friday and sent out a press release quoting its president, Andrew Walters, calling for no such measure in November’s election.

The impetus for this budding movement in prosperous, tech-dominated cities is the belief that the traffic congestion and housing shortages in those places is due to tech growth, Cupertino Vice Mayor Rod Sinks recently told the Business Journal.

But although no one from Cupertino’s chamber would comment on the record, the organization’s opposition stems from the fact that the tax revenue the city hopes to gain is not restricted to specific projects that would address transportation issues that the chamber sees as most critical, the Business Journal was told.

Tonight’s meeting will be to decide what kind of tax — head tax (based on the number of a company’s employees), payroll tax or an expansion of Cupertino’s existing square-footage tax — might be proposed.

 

 

Read more on Silicon Valley Business Journal

 

 

Oakland’s growing pains could stifle future development

Dozens of cranes dot Oakland’s skyline and thousands of new housing units are in the works, making the current cycle one of the most robust in Oakland’s history.

As more people and businesses turn toward Oakland as a cheaper area to live and work, Oakland has struggled to keep up with both office and housing demand. Downtown Oakland is one of the tightest office markets in the country and multifamily rents have risen 51% since the start of the cycle.

Developers and designers are looking for ways to build more efficiently to keep rents down, but growing community activism, overworked city planning staff and tightening financing could stall future growth in Oakland.

Panelists discussed these topics as well as the impact of modular units and designing housing to meet residents’ changing needs during Bisnow’s Oakland Construction and Development Update event Thursday.

With 900 housing units delivering this year and 2,400 next year, the city is undergoing rapid change.

“Instead of the city [staff] focusing on department stores and auto dealerships, they’re making Oakland a very vibrant place to live,” Junction Properties owner Charles Long said during the event.

The increased development has spurred an anti-displacement movement and a backlash over a lack of affordable housing, which could shut down the future fulfillment of housing that Oakland has in its pipeline, he said.

Developers need to be more cognizant of working with the city and other stakeholders to better address the anti-displacement backlash, he said.

 

Read more on Bisnow

 

 

Why clothing stores are still opening in San Francisco

A majority of shuttered mall stores over the past few years have been clothing shops, but new Bay Area leases show a sector not in free fall quite yet.

Hip women’s clothier ModCloth, streetwear brand Supreme, athleisure label outdoor Voice and luxury basics purveyor Everlane are among a new class of specialized labels defying recent trends.

Shifting consumer demands, years of oversupply and the rise of ecommerce combined to trigger more than 7,050 tore closings last year, according to Coresight Research. Already, the New York-based retail analyst has tracked nearly 3,900 store closings compared to about 1,800 openings this year.

Yet, while most clothing brands are racing to weed out underperforming stores, others are ramping up.

 

Read more on San Francisco Business Times

 

 

The future of the shopping mall is not about shopping

When Cirque du Soleil announced plans this week for a “family entertainment” concept inside a Toronto mall, it said a lot about the future of shopping centers.

The 24,000 sq.ft. space, called “Creactive”, will be a circus-inspired playground with a range of activities from juggling to high-wire – allowing fans to “peek behind the curtain and imagine themselves stepping into our artists’ shoes”, according to Marie Josée Lamy, producer of Creactive. “Hanging at the mall” will take on an entirely new connotation as shoppers take to the flying trapeze. And that’s the point.

No longer is it good enough for malls to be passive places to buy stuff – they have to be engaging places to do stuff. Otherwise, this particular retail format will be relegated to relic status – “a historical anachronism, a 60-year or so aberration that no longer meets the public’s, the consumer’s or the retailer’s needs”, as developer Rick Caruso mused.

With that point in mind, I draw your attention to Exhibit A: Randall Park Mall in Ohio. When it opened in 1976, Randall Park Mall was briefly the world’s biggest shopping center. It quickly lost relevance however, and by 2000, Randall Park Mall’s vacancy rate was 92%. Fast forward to 2017 when it was revealed that Amazon was constructing a 855,000 shipping center on the same site. Online triumphs over offline, or “software eats retail” as Netscape founder and venture capitalist Marc Andreessen memorably put it. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

 

 

Read more on Forbes